Thursday, June 16, 2022

How Much Can You Make Working While On Social Security

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Special Rules For The Year You Hit Full Retirement Age

Working While Collecting Social Security

In the year you reach full retirement age, youre likely to go over the SSA earnings limit, as you might still be working your full-time job for half the year or more. In recognition of this, the SSA makes some adjustments to the earnings withholding policy. Rather than reducing benefits by $1 for every $2 you earn, in the year you hit full retirement age, your benefits are only reduced by $1 for every $3 you earn. Additionally, the earnings limit gets a substantial boost, from $18,960 to $50,520.

So, if you earn $59,520 before hitting full retirement age, your payout will be reduced by $3,000, as youre $9,000 over the earnings limit. However, the month you hit full retirement age, your benefits will be adjusted upwards to reflect the prior withholding.

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Should I Work And Take Social Security

If you want to maximize your monthly Social Security checks, the simplest retirement strategy is to wait until full retirement age before claiming your benefits. That way, you’ll be able to earn an unlimited amount without losing a penny of your Social Security.

If waiting that long isn’t an option, there are still some things you can do. For many, claiming at the beginning of the year in which you’ll reach full retirement age works out fine because the higher earnings limits make it less likely that you’ll give up your Social Security.

Finally, if you’re expecting to work on a part-time basis, it’s smart to look at the earnings limits and how they compare with your pay. If it looks like you might trigger the provisions, then you might decide to work a little less to keep all your benefits.

Can I Still Receive Social Security If I Go Back To Work In Florida

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Current statistics show us that you may want to work beyond your retirement age. This could be due to a personal choice, or out of financial necessity. If you are currently receiving Social Security benefits though, you must be aware of how going back to work can affect your payments. Earning income above a certain amount, could cause a reduction in benefits and cause these benefits to be taxed.

Whether it makes sense to work and collect Social Security at the same time is a complicated issue that directly corresponds to how much you earn and when you began receiving Social Security.

If you are now receiving Social Security benefits, Social Security Disability Insurance , and/or Supplemental Security Income benefits, you must report any changes involving your work activity.

You must tell the Social Security Administration if:

  • You start or stop work.
  • You reported your work, but your duties, hours, or salary may have changed.
  • When you receive Social Security retirement benefits, for our purposes you are retired.

You can get Social Security retirement benefits and work at the same time. However, there is a limit to how much you can earn and still receive full benefits. Some general guidelines give you an idea of how getting Social Security benefits and working are financially handled.

These include:

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How Much Unearned Income Can You Have Without Losing Ssi

You’ll also lose your benefits if you have too much unearned income. And all your unearned income counts, as opposed to just half your earned income.

This means you will lose your SSI benefits as soon as your unearned income hits $791 per month in 2019. You become ineligible with $791 in income — rather than when you hit the federal benefits limit of $771 — because of the rule allowing you to subtract the first $20 of income from any source.

How Much Money Can You Have In The Bank On Social Security Retirement

How Much Can You Make While Receiving Social Security?

Because SSDI is this type of benefit, a persons assets have nothing to do with their potential eligibility to draw and collect SSDI. In other words, whether you have $50 or $50,000 in the bank makes no difference to the SSA.

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Working And Ssdi Benefits

Generally, SSDI recipients can’t do what’s considered “substantial gainful activity” and continue to receive disability benefits. In a nutshell, doing SGA means you are working and making more than $1,310 per month in 2021 . To encourage SSDI recipients to go back to work, however, Social Security has created some exceptions to this rule. SSDI recipients are entitled to a trial work period during which they can make more than the SGA amount without losing benefits.

For the nine-month trial work period, SSDI recipients are entitled to test their ability to work and continue to receive full benefits regardless of whether they make more than the SGA amount. For 2021, the Social Security Administration considers any month where a person has a monthly income of more than $940 to be a trial work month. If you are self-employed, any month where you work more than 80 hours can also be considered a trial work month.

Once you have completed the nine-month trial work period , you can still receive SSDI for any month where your earnings fall below the SGA level, for a period of 36 months. This three-year period is called the “extended period of eligibility.” In other words, if you earn less than $1,310 in any month, you will get benefits, but if you earn more than $1,310 in any month, you won’t get disability benefits for that month .

For more information, see our article on the trial work period, the extended period of eligibility, and expedited reinstatement.

Can I Draw Social Security At 62 And Still Work Full Time

If you work and are full retirement age or older, you can earn as much as you want and your benefits will not be reduced. However, individuals may begin taking Social Security retirement benefits early beginning at age 62. Once you reach full retirement age, your benefits will no longer be reduced.

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Working In The Year You Hit Fra

If you hit FRA during the year you work, you can still have some of your Social Security benefits withheld if you exceed earnings limits prior to reaching full retirement age.

There’s an income limit again, but it’s much higher. And you have just $1 in benefits withheld for every $3 above the limit, not for every $2 above the limit.

For 2019, the income limit before benefits are affected is $46,920. So let’s look at our same examples in which you’re receiving $14,000 in annual Social Security income and you work during the year you hit FRA.

  • If you work and earn $6,000 or $35,000, you haven’t exceeded the $46,920 limit, so you won’t have any of your benefits withheld.
  • If you work and earn $80,000, you’ve exceeded the $46,920 limit by $33,080. Benefits are reduced by $1 for every $3 above the limit, so they are reduced by about $11,026.67. All but around $2,973 of your $14,000 Social Security benefit will be withheld.
  • If you work and earn $100,000, you’ve exceeded the $46,920 limit by $53,080. This results in $17,693 being withheld, so you wouldn’t get any benefits at all.

How Much Money Can I Make When I Retire At 62

Working While Collecting Social Security. Avoid Losing Your Social Security Benefits.

If you start benefits between the month you turn 62 and the month you reach full retirement age, the Social Security Administration will deduct one dollar from your annual benefit amount for every two dollars you make above an annual limit. As of 2019, this limit is $17,640 per year or $1,470 a month.

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Limits On Earned Income If Claiming Early Benefits

Until you reach full retirement age, Social Security will subtract money from your retirement check if you exceed a certain amount of earned income for the year. For the year 2021, this limit on earned income is $18,960 . The amount goes up each year. If you are collecting Social Security retirement benefits before full retirement age, your benefits are reduced by $1 for every $2 you earn over the limit. Once you reach full retirement age, there is no limit on the amount of money you may earn and still receive your full Social Security retirement benefit.

Example

Henry is considering claiming early retirement benefits this year, at age 64. Social Security calculates that if he does so, he’ll receive $866 a month . But Henry also intends to continue working part-time, with an income that will be about $5,000 over the yearly limit on earned income. If he does claim the early benefits and makes that part-time income each month, Henry would lose one dollar out of two from the $5,000 he earns over the limit, which means $2,500 for the year. So, by claiming early retirement and continuing to earn over the limit, Henry incurs a double penalty: His retirement benefits are permanently reduced by 13%, and he loses an additional amount every month to the extent he earns over the income limit.

Social Security does not reduce each monthly check by a small amount, unfortunately. Instead, the agency may withhold several months’ entire checks until the reduction is paid off.

What Is Full Retirement Age

Full retirement age is the age at which you can begin receiving your full benefit amount with no reductions. So, how old do you need to be to be considered full retirement age? It depends on the year in which you were born. If you were born after 1960, then your full retirement age is 67 years old. For those born from 1943 to 1954, normal retirement age is 66 years old. Birth years between 1954 and 1960 get a couple of months added to the full retirement age for each year.

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How We Deduct Earnings From Benefits

In 2021, if youre under full retirement age, the annual earnings limit is $18,960. If you will reach full retirement age in 2021, the limit on your earnings for the months before full retirement age is $50,520.

Starting with the month you reach full retirement age, there is no limit on how much you can earn and still receive your benefits.

Let’s look at a few examples. You are receiving Social Security retirement benefits every month in 2021 and you:

  • Are under full retirement age all year. You are entitled to $800 a month in benefits.

    You work and earn $28,960 during the year. Your Social Security benefits would be reduced by $5,000 . You would receive $4,600 of your $9,600 in benefits for the year.

  • Reach full retirement age in August 2021. You are entitled to $800 per month in benefits.

    You work and earn $63,000 during the year, with $52,638 of it in the 7 months from January through July.

    • Your Social Security benefits would be reduced through July by $706 . You would still receive $4,894 out of your $5,600 benefits for the first 7 months.
    • Beginning in August 2021, when you reach full retirement age, you would receive your full benefit , no matter how much you earn.

If you are eligible for retirement benefits this year and are still working, you can use our earnings test calculator to see how your earnings could affect your benefit payments.

How Long Should I Work

8 Things Everyone Wants to Know About Social Security

There are so many benefits to work: staying engaged, social connection, mental stimulation and, of course, income.

You should work as long as you need to and as long as you want to.

A retirement planning calculator can be a helpful tool to help you assess how work income impacts your long term retirement plan.

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The Extended Period Of Eligibility

After your nine-month trial work period expires, you begin the 36-month extended period of eligibility. During this time, you can earn up to the SGA limit and still receive your full monthly SSDI benefits.

The first month you exceed the SGA limit, the SSA no longer considers you disabled. You will get your benefits for that month and the next two months and then benefits will stop.

If your monthly income later falls below the SGA limit again, the SSA can restart your benefits without requiring a new application if you are still within the 36-month extended period of eligibility.

At Berger and Green, we can explain the SSAs rules about returning to work. Call us today at to schedule a consultation.

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Subsidies And Special Conditions

Subsidies and special conditions are supports you get on the job that result in you getting more pay than the actual value of the services you perform. A subsidy is support that you get from your employer special conditions are generally supplied by someone other than your employer, for example, a Vocational Rehabilitation agency.

Social Security considers subsidies and special conditions when they make an SGA decision. They only use earnings that represent the real value of the work you do to decide if your work is at the SGA limit. This is good for you because if Social Security decides that you have a subsidy or special conditions, you can earn more while still getting benefits.

Subsidies or special conditions may exist if:

  • You get more supervision than other workers doing the same or a similar job for the same pay
  • You have fewer or simpler tasks to complete than other workers doing the same job for the same pay, or
  • You have a job coach or mentor who helps you perform some of your work.

If you think you get a subsidy, talk to Social Security about it. They may ask you to get a letter from your employer, so they can document that you get a subsidy. If you think special conditions may apply to you, talk about it with Social Security. Also talk to your mentor or job coach they may need to supply documentation so that you can be recognized as having a special condition.

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Can I See Some Example Calculations Of Getting Social Security Benefits While Working

Here are a few example calculations:

  • You are under full retirement age all year, and you are entitled to $800 a month in benefits .

You work and earn $28,960 during the year. Your Social Security benefits would be reduced by $5,000 . You would receive $4,600 of your $9,600 in benefits for the year.

  • You Reach full retirement age in August 2021 and you are entitled to $800 per month in benefits.

You work and earn $63,000 during the year, with $52,638 of it in the 7 months from January through July .

Your Social Security benefits would be reduced through July by $706 . You would still receive $4,894 out of your $5,600 benefits for the first 7 months .

Beginning in August 2021, when you reach full retirement age, you would receive your full benefit , no matter how much you earn.

  • Remember that Social Security does not count pensions, annuities, investment income, interest, veterans, or other government or military retirement benefits against your deductible income.

Yes, its confusing, and the more assets are involved, the worse it can be. By consulting with a knowledgeable social securities lawyer, all the details can be gone through and explained. You worked hard for your Social Security benefits, and they will be sure you get what you deserve.

You Can Work And Claim Social Security At The Same Time But Should You

Working While Collecting Social Security

Social Security is commonly seen as a source of retirement income. But you’re allowed to work and take Social Security retirement benefits or survivor benefits at the same time. If you do so before you reach full retirement age, though, Social Security may withhold part of your benefits.

Below we’ll cover how you can get Social Security benefits even while you’re still working. Learn how you can keep as much of that money as possible.

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What Is A Substantial Gainful Activity Limit And How Does It Apply To My Benefits

The SSA sets an upper limit for how much earned income you can make and still fit their definition of disabled. This is the substantial gainful activity limit. The SSA adjusts this limit annually to account for changes in the cost of living.

In 2017, disabled workers can earn up to $1,170 per month and still qualify under the SGA limit. There is a higher limit for blind workers, who can earn up to $1,950 per month. If you earn above this limit, you are unlikely to qualify for SSD benefits. However, if you earn above this level while already receiving SSDI payments, it will not automatically stop your benefits. You may be entitled to a trial work period.

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What To Know About Working While Receiving Retirement Benefits

If you take Social Security benefits before you reach your full retirement age, and you earn an annual income in excess of the annual earnings limit for that year, your monthly Social Security benefit will be reduced for the remainder of the year in which you exceed the limit. If you will reach full retirement age during that same year, it will be reduced every month until you reach full retirement age.

The income withheld will be paid out once you reach full retirement age. In other words, your benefits aren’t lost they’re delayed.

Investment income does not count toward the annual earnings limit the only income that counts is earned incomethe income you earn by working either for someone or as a self-employed person.

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