Monday, May 16, 2022

How Much Do You Collect From Social Security

Don't Miss

Earn Ssa Work Credits In Some Countries

Social Security – How much can I expect to receive

You may not have enough credits from your work in the United States to qualify for retirement benefits. But, you may be able to count your work credits from another country. The SSA has agreements with 24 countries. If you earned credits in one of those countries, they can help you qualify for U.S. benefits.

How Much Money Can I Make When I Retire At 62

If you start benefits between the month you turn 62 and the month you reach full retirement age, the Social Security Administration will deduct one dollar from your annual benefit amount for every two dollars you make above an annual limit. As of 2019, this limit is $17,640 per year or $1,470 a month.

Other Benefits Will Be Delayed If You Delay Your Old Age Security Payment

If you are not in receipt of the Old Age Security pension:

  • you cannot get the Guaranteed Income Supplement
  • your spouse cannot apply for the Allowance

Note: The Guaranteed Income Supplement and Allowance amounts dont increase when you delay receiving Old Age Security pension payments. You cannot receive the Guaranteed Income Supplement and your partner cannot receive the Allowance when you are not receiving the Old Age Security pension.

When monthly increases are not applied

If you decide to delay receiving the Old Age Security pension, you will not receive monthly increases during any month where you are:

  • in federal prison as a result of a sentence of 2 years or longer
  • outside Canada, have less than 20 years of residence in Canada and do not qualify under an international social security agreement

Read Also: Get Social Security Early

What Happens If You Claim After Your Fra

If you wait until youre age 70 to start claiming benefits, then youll get an extra 8% per yearor, in total, 132% of your primary insurance amount for the rest of your life. Claiming after you turn 70 doesnt increase your benefits further, so theres no reason to wait longer than that.

The longer you can afford to wait after age 62 , the larger your monthly benefit will be. Nevertheless, delaying benefits doesnt necessarily mean that youll come out ahead overall. You also need to weigh in some other factors, including your expected longevity and whether you plan to file for spousal benefits. You will also need to consider the tax, investment opportunity, and health coverage implications.

Claiming Social Security Benefits At The Right Time Means More Money In Your Pocket Here’s A Guide To Everything From Knowing Your Full Retirement Age To Taking Social Security Spousal Benefits

University of California

For many Americans, Social Security benefits are the bedrock of retirement income. Maximizing that stream of income is critical to funding your retirement dreams.

The rules for claiming Social Security benefits can be complex, but this guide will help you wade through the details. By educating yourself about Social Security, you can ensure that you claim the maximum amount to which you are entitled.

Here are 12 essential details you need to know.

You May Like: When Can You Get Social Security At What Age

Get Your Social Security Estimates

The SSA website provides estimates for how much you’ll collect if you start receiving benefits at age 62, your full retirement age , and age 70. Remember that you don’t have to start taking your benefits at those milestone ages you and your spouse can start collecting anytime between ages 62 and 70.

Combined Income Base Amounts In 2020

Single filers with combined incomes of less than $25,000 will not pay taxes on Social Security benefits as of tax year 2020.

  • Those with combined incomes between $25,000 and $34,000 will pay taxes on up to 50% of their benefits.
  • Those making more than $34,000 will pay taxes on up to 85% of their benefits.

It works a bit differently for married couples who file joint tax returns. In this case, you must add together the income of both spouses, even if one of you isn’t getting Social Security. Couples with combined incomes of less than $32,000 won’t pay taxes on their benefits.

  • Those with combined incomes between $32,000 and $44,000 will pay taxes on up to 50% of their benefits.
  • Those making more than $44,000 will pay taxes on up to 85% of their benefits.

You May Like: What Is Needed To Get Your Social Security Card

How The Length Of Your Career Affects Your Benefits

One of the most important factors when it comes to your benefit amount is the number of years you’ve worked. Most people become eligible for Social Security retirement benefits once they’ve earned income for 10 years, but you’ll need to work for at least 35 years to receive the maximum benefit amount.

When calculating the amount you’ll receive, the Social Security Administration takes an average of your wages throughout the 35 highest-earning years of your career. That number is then adjusted for inflation, and the result is the amount you’ll collect if you claim at your full retirement age .

If you work more than 35 years, only the years with the highest earnings will be counted — which could increase your average and result in a higher benefit amount. If you work fewer than 35 years, however, you’ll have zeros added to the equation, which will bring down your average.

How Your Social Security Benefits Are Calculated

How Much Money Will You Get From Social Security?

Your Social Security benefits are based on the 35 calendar years in which you earned the most money. If you have fewer than 35 years of earnings, each year with no earnings will be factored in at zero. You can increase your Social Security benefit at any time by replacing a zero or low-income year with a higher-income year.

There is a maximum Social Security benefit amount you can receive, though it depends on the age you retire. For someone at full retirement age in 2021, the maximum monthly benefit is $3,113. For someone filing at age 70, the maximum monthly amount is $3,895.

You can estimate your own benefit by using Social Security’s online Retirement Estimator.

Don’t Miss: How Much Social Security Will I Get At 64

How Is Social Security Calculated

To determine your monthly benefits, the Social Security Administration uses a series of somewhat complicated calculations. At their heart is an inflation-adjusted average of your monthly income from your highest earning years.

This monthly average is run through an income replacement formula that determines your base monthly Social Security payment rate in retirement. This base rate will then be adjusted upward or downward depending on a few factors, like your age when you start claiming Social Security benefits, your employment status in retirement, your tax bracket and your Medicare premiums.

If that sounds overly complex, dont fret. Heres how each part of the Social Security calculation breaks down.

Is There A Maximum Benefit

Yes, there is a limit to how much you can receive in Social Security benefits. The maximum Social Security benefit changes each year. For 2021, itâs $3,895/month for those who retire at age 70 . Multiply that by 12 to get $46,740 in maximum annual benefits. If that’s less than your anticipated annual expenses, youâll need to have additional income from your own savings to supplement it.

Don’t Miss: How Much Social Security Can I Draw

Social Security Income Limit 2021

Note: The Social Security earnings limit changes each year. The most current version of this article uses numbers for 2021.

At one of my first speaking engagements, I heard a great story from one of the attendees. Her experience provides us with one of the best examples Ive ever heard of how much the Social Security income limit can catch you by surprise.

A few years earlier, shed been at her bridge club when the topic turned to Social Security. As she and the other card players chatted about the best way to leverage Social Security Benefits, the consensus around the table seemed to be that filing at 62 was the smartest thing to do.

This lady, trusting the advice of some of her closest friends, did just that: She filed for benefits as soon as she turned 62.

She then told me shed always wanted to buy a brand-new Toyota Camry. She figured that, once she started receiving Social Security income, it would be the perfect time to buy the car. She was still working, which meant her Social Security check would be extra income.

As she told the story to me, she bought the car and took out a car loan to do it. She planned to repay the loan using some of the income she expected to receive from her Social Security benefits since she filed for them.

Imagine her surprise, then, when a nasty letter from Social Security Administration showed up in her mailbox. The letter claimed she had been paid benefits that she was not eligible for!

How The Earnings Limit Is Applied

Social Security Benefits for Children: The 4 Most ...

The most confusing part of the benefit reduction due to income is how its reflected in your monthly benefits deposits. Instead of taking out a little bit every month, the SSA will withhold several months of benefits at a time.

If you predict in advance that you will have excess earnings and report this to the Social Security Administration, they may take a few months of benefits before you actually earn the anticipated excess earnings.

For example, if your Social Security payment is $1,667 per month, and you expect to receive $28,960 in wages from your job, the Administration would calculate that youll be over your earnings limit by $10,000 and thus $5,000 in benefits should be withheld. So, they would withhold your benefit payment from January to March. In April, your checks would resume.

If you dont report excess income before you earn it, then you have to report this information after the fact. You can do this when you file your income tax return, but the preferred method is to be proactive and call your local Social Security Administration office.

If you wait for the Social Security Administration to learn of your excess earnings via your tax return, there could be a significant gap between the time you earn the excess income and the time that they withhold your benefits. In most cases, its better to report the excess earnings quickly so the benefits reduction occurs closer to the time you actually earn that extra income.

Recommended Reading: Full Social Security Benefit

The Social Security Rules Teachers Need To Know

In the 1970s and 1980s, laws were passed that amended the Social Security rules to keep individuals from double dipping, or receiving both a Social Security benefit and a pension from a job where they did not pay into the Social Security system.

The results of these amendments are two rules that could impact your ability to claim your full Social Security benefit as a teacher: The Windfall Elimination Provision and the Government Pension Offset .

These provisions reduce benefits for those who worked in a job in which they:

  • Qualified for a pension and
  • Did not pay Social Security taxes.
  • This is not limited to teachers. Other professions that often fall into this group include public sector workers like firefighters, police officers and numerous other state, county and local employees.

    Taxes On Your Benefits

    Your Social Security benefits may be partially taxable if your combined income exceeds certain thresholds. Regardless of how much you make, the first 15% of your benefits are not taxed.

    The SSA defines combined income using this formula:

    • Your adjusted gross income + nontaxable interest + half of your Social Security benefits = your combined income

    If you file your federal tax return as an individual and your combined income is $25,000 to $34,000, then you may have to pay income tax on up to 50% of your benefits. If your combined income is more than $34,000, then you may have to pay tax on up to 85% of your benefits.

    If youre married, filing a joint return, and your combined income is $32,000 to $44,000, then you may have to pay income tax on up to 50% of your benefits. If your combined income is more than $44,000, then you may have to pay tax on up to 85% of your benefits.

    Read Also: How To Apply For Social Security In Washington State

    Inflation Medicare Will Erode The Adjustment

    To be sure, people getting Social Security should understand that the COLA isn’t meant for them to necessarily be able to spend more or have a bigger budget it’s to keep their cost of living the same as prices rise due to inflation.

    Right now, prices on things such as rent, gas, utilities and food have increased due to inflation.

    In addition, those who are on Medicare or Medicaid will also likely not see a full 5.9% bump because of premiums associated with health care. Premium hikes for Medicare Part B, for example, are due in November. The latest Medicare trustees report estimates a $10 increase to Part B, raising the monthly rate to $158.50 for 2022 from $148.50.

    Those payments are generally taken out of Social Security and may eat into the adjustment. However, a special rule called the hold harmless provision protects people from getting smaller Social Security checks because of Medicaid and Medicare.

    “You might not get a lot more because of the Medicare premiums,” Altman said. After the premiums are announced, beneficiaries should get a letter in December from the Social Security Administration that will outline their checks for 2022, she added.

    Your Social Security Benefits Will Be Taxed

    Working While Collecting Social Security

    Most people know that you pay tax into the Social Security Trust Fund throughout your career, but did you know that you may also have to pay tax on your Social Security benefits once you start receiving them? Benefits lost their tax-free status in 1984, and the income thresholds for triggering tax on benefits haven’t been increased since then.

    As a result, it doesn’t take a lot of income for your Social Security benefits to be pinched by Uncle Sam. For example, a married couple with a combined income of more than $32,000 may have to pay income tax on up to 50% of their Social Security benefits. Higher earners may have to pay income tax on up to 85% of their benefits.

    You may also have to pay state income taxes on your Social Security benefits. See our list of the 13 States That Tax Social Security Benefits.

    Don’t Miss: Can I Locate Someone By Their Social Security Number

    What Happens If I Work And Get Social Security Retirement Benefits

    You can get Social Security retirement benefits and work at the same time. However, if you are younger than full retirement age and make more than the yearly earnings limit, we will reduce your benefit. Starting with the month you reach full retirement age, we will not reduce your benefits no matter how much you earn.

    • We use the following earnings limits to reduce your benefits: If you are under full retirement age for the entire year, we deduct $1 from your benefit payments for every $2 you earn above the annual limit.

    For 2021 that limit is $18,960.

    • In the year you reach full retirement age, we deduct $1 in benefits for every $3 you earn above a different limit, but we only count earnings before the month you reach your full retirement age.

    If you will reach full retirement age in 2021, the limit on your earnings for the months before full retirement age is $50,520.

    Starting with the month you reach full retirement age, you can get your benefits with no limit on your earnings.

    Use our Retirement Age Calculator to find your full retirement age based on your date of birth.

    Use our Retirement Earnings Test Calculator to find out how much your benefits will be reduced.

    What counts as earnings:

    Your benefits may increase when you work:

    When youre ready to apply for retirement benefits, use our online retirement application, the quickest, easiest, and most convenient way to apply.

    If you need to report a change in your earnings after you begin receiving benefits:

    An Advanced Claiming Strategy

    If you or your spouse reached age 62 by the end of 2015, you qualify for a Social Security claiming strategy called restricted application.

    Here’s how it works: The younger spouse claims Social Security benefits based on his or her own earnings record.

    When the older spouse reaches full retirement age , he or she files a restricted application for spousal benefits only. At that point, both spouses are claiming benefits based on the younger spouse’s earnings record.

    Then, at age 70, the older spouse claims benefits based on his or her own earnings record, which have increased to 132% of what that spouse would’ve been eligible for at FRA.

    See how it works:Restricted application

    Recommended Reading: Social Security Benefits Us

    At What Age Is Social Security No Longer Taxed

    At 65 to 67, depending on the year of your birth, you are at full retirement age and can get full Social Security retirement benefits tax-free. However, if youre still working, part of your benefits might be subject to taxation. The IRS adds the figures for your earnings and half your Social Security benefits.

    What About The Government Pension Offset

    Delaying Social Security Retirement Benefits

    The nitty-gritty of the Government Pension Offset is simple. If you meet both of requirements for the GPO you are entitled to a Social Security benefit as a survivor or spouse and have a pension from a government job where you did not pay Social Security tax your Social Security survivor or spousal benefit will be reduced by an amount equal to two-thirds of your pension.

    As an example, lets say Michael worked for 30 years as a teacher in California and his wife was an accountant.

    Upon retirement, he began receiving his California teachers retirement pension of $3,000 per month. His wife retired at the same time and filed for her Social Security benefits of $2,300 per month. Sadly, she passed away a short three years later.

    Upon her death, Michael learned that because of his CalSTRS pension he would not be eligible to receive a normal Social Security survivors benefit. Thanks to the GPO his survivors benefit was reduced to a measly $300 per month. Heres the math:

    Some would say thats not fair and I think they have a compelling point. Why? In a case like this the GPO only applies because of Michaels chosen profession. This is effectively a penalty for teaching .

    If he had been a pharmacist instead of working in education, he would have been eligible to receive the full $2,200 per month.

    If youd like to dig into the Government Pension Offset a little deeper, see my article on What You Should Know About the Government Pension Offset.

    You May Like: When Can You Get Social Security At What Age

    More articles

    Popular Articles