Thursday, August 18, 2022

How Old Can I Collect Social Security

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Your Monthly Social Security Benefits Increase The Longer You Wait To Claim

When Can I Retire and Collect Social Security? What’s The Best Age?

You can collect Social Security benefits as soon as you turn 62, but taking benefits before your full retirement age means a permanent reduction in your payments of as much as 25% to 30%, depending on your full retirement age.

If you wait until you hit full retirement age to claim Social Security benefits, youll receive 100% of your earned benefits. But you can also get a big bonus by waiting to claim your Social Security benefits at age 70 your monthly Social Security benefit will grow by 8% a year until then. Any cost-of-living adjustments will be included, too, so you don’t forgo those by waiting.

Waiting to claim your Social Security benefits can help your heirs as well. By waiting to take her benefit, a high-earning wife, for example, can ensure that her low-earning husband will receive a much higher survivor benefit in the event she dies before him. That extra income of up to 32% could make a big difference.

You Need To Pay Down Debt

There are some debts you need to tackle before you retire. If you have high-interest debt, claiming Social Security early can help you pay the debt down. Depending on the interest rate youre paying, the 8% yearly boost to your benefits that you receive for each year you wait past full retirement age might not be worth the increased monthly benefit. Using the early benefits to reduce or eliminate your debt earlier could mean youll be able to keep more of your benefits in the future.

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Is Social Security Based On The Last 5 Years Of Work

Social Security benefits are based on your lifetime earnings. Your actual earnings are adjusted or indexed to account for changes in average wages since the year the earnings were received. Then Social Security calculates your average indexed monthly earnings during the 35 years in which you earned the most.

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What About Taxes On Social Security

Keep in mind that Social Security benefits may be taxable, depending on your combined income. Your combined income is equal to your adjusted gross income , plus non-taxable interest payments , plus half of your Social Security benefit.

As your combined income increases above a certain threshold , more of your benefit is subject to income tax, up to a maximum of 85%. For help, talk with a CPA or tax professional.

In any case, if you’re still working, you may want to postpone Social Security either until you reach your full retirement age or until your earned income is less than the annual limit. In no situation should you postpone benefits past age 70.

Before You Make Your Decision

Can I Collect Social Security While I

There are advantages and disadvantages to taking your benefit before your full retirement age. The advantage is that you collect benefits for a longer period of time. The disadvantage is your benefit will be reduced. Each person’s situation is different. It is important to remember:

  • If you delay your benefits until after full retirement age, you will be eligible for delayed retirement credits that would increase your monthly benefit.
  • That there are other things to consider when making the decision about when to begin receiving your retirement benefits.

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How Will Working Affect Social Security Benefits

In a recent survey, 68% of current workers stated they plan to work for pay after retiring.1

And that possibility raises an interesting question: how will working affect Social Security benefits?

The answer to that question requires an understanding of three key concepts: full retirement age, the earnings test, and taxable benefits.

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How Does Full Retirement Age Affect Social Security

If your full retirement age is 65 and you start receiving Social Security benefits at age 62, your monthly benefit will be decreased by 20 percent, according to the SSA . If your full retirement age is 67 and you start collecting Social Security at 62, your monthly benefit will be reduced by approximately 30 percent.

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When A Spouse Dies

When one spouse dies, the surviving spouse is entitled to receive the higher of their own benefit or their deceased spouses benefit. Thats why financial planners often advise the higher-earning spouse to delay claiming. If the higher-earning spouse dies first, then the surviving, lower-earning spouse will receive a larger Social Security check for life.

When the surviving spouse hasnt reached their FRA, they will be entitled to prorated amounts starting at age 60. Once at their FRA, the surviving spouse is entitled to 100% of the deceased spouses benefit or their own benefit, whichever is higher.

Understanding The Full Retirement Age

Can you work while collecting social security? (deeper look)

Social Security uses full retirement age to calculate 100 percent of your benefit amount. For individuals born in 1942 or earlier, full retirement age is 65. Individuals born from 1943 to 1954 reach full retirement age at 66.

Persons born after 1960 reach full retirement age at 67, and a birth date between 1955 and 1959 increases the full retirement age two months for every year. An individual born in 1955 reaches full retirement age at 66 years and 2 months 1956 is 66 years and 4 months.

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Coordinate With Your Spouse

Finally, if you’re , coordinating with your spouse can deliver bigger benefits, too.

Imagine this scenario: You’re married, and your spouse has generally earned much more than you. You both start collecting benefits as soon as you can, at age 62. You collect, say, $1,800 per month, and your spouse collects, say, $2,300. If your spouse dies first, your household can no longer collect both checks instead, you get the greater of the two, so your benefit rises to $2,300.

But if your spouse had been able to delay starting to collect until age 70, that $2,300 check could have grown by 24% into a $2,850 one. Strategizing with a spouse can be a powerful income-maximizing move.

It’s well worth taking a little time to learn more about Social Security, because it’s likely to provide a meaningful chunk of your retirement income, and it’s worth getting as much out of the program as you can.

Explaining Social Security, TLDR edition: The 8 things you should learn about your benefits

If You Have Lived In Canada Less Than 40 Years

Not everyone receives the full Old Age Security pension. The amount you receive depends on the number of years you have lived in Canada.

If you lived in Canada for less than 40 years you will receive a partial payment amount. Your payment amount is based on the number of years in Canada divided by 40.

You can delay your first payment up to 5 years to get a higher amount.

Example

If you lived in Canada for 20 years

If you lived in Canada for 20 years after age 18, you would receive a payment equal to 20 divided by 40, or 50%, of the full Old Age Security pension.

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Are Social Security Benefits Taxable At Full Retirement Age

Your age does not have an impact on whether you will owe tax on Social Security benefits. Depending on your earnings, you may pay federal taxes on Social Security benefits regardless of the age at which you claim.

Social Security benefits are taxed on amounts exceeding the “provisional income” limit set by the IRS. To calculate your provisional income, add up all non-Social Security sources of income, including nontaxable income such as municipal bond interest, and include half of your annual Social Security income.

Single filers earning provisional income between $25,000 and $34,000 and married joint filers earning between $32,000 and $44,000 will owe income taxes on 50% of their Social Security benefits. For single filers with provisional income above $34,000 and married filers above $44,000, up to 85% of Social Security benefits will be taxable.

Increasing The Eligibility Age For Social Security Pensions

If you don

Summary

Social Security faces a long-term financing problem. Many young workers believe the problem is so severe they may never receive a Social Security check. The most logical solution to Social Securitys financing problem is to trim promised benefits and increase payroll taxes moderately. A sensible way to reduce future benefits is to increase the early eligibility age and normal retirement age for retirement pensions. This reform is justified by the substantial increase in life spans that has occurred since Social Security was established in the 1930s. An increase in life spans, when the normal retirement age remains unchanged, is equivalent to a sizable increase in lifetime Social Security benefits.

Increasing the retirement age is unpopular with voters. Unfortunately, so are all other reforms that would restore Social Security to solvency, including tax hikes and cuts in the formula for calculating full pensions.

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How To Calculate Social Security Benefits

Lets say your FRA is 66. If you start claiming benefits at age 66 and your full monthly benefit is $2,000, then youll get $2,000 per month. If you start claiming benefits at age 62, which is 48 months early, then your benefit will be reduced to 75% of your full monthly benefitalso called your primary insurance amount. In other words, youll get 25% less per month, and your check will be $1,500.

That reduced benefit wont increase once you reach age 66. Rather, youll continue to receive it for the rest of your life. It may go up over time due to cost-of-living adjustments , but only slightly. You can do the math for your own situation using the Social Security Administration Early or Late Retirement Calculator, one of a number of benefit calculators provided by the SSA that can also help you determine your FRA, the SSAs estimate of your life expectancy for benefit calculations, rough estimates of your retirement benefits, individualized projections of your benefits based on your personal work record, and more.

Although the cost-of-living adjustments announced each year are usually only slight increases, Social Security benefits will increase by 5.9% in 2022, marking the largest increase since 1982.

What Is The Minimum Social Security Payment

That minimum gets changed every year based on inflation. For 2019, a person would have to earn at least $14,805 to get credit for the year for special minimum benefit purposes.The basics of Social Securitys minimum benefit. Years of Coverage Minimum Benefit at Full Retirement Age 30 or more $872.50.

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Should You Wait To Start Collecting Old Age Security

Can I collect Social Security Retirement and Social Security Disability?

You can receive your first Old Age Security pension payment the month after you turn 65.

You can receive a higher amount for each month you decide to delay your first payment.

You can delay payment of the Old Age Security pension for up to 60 months after you are 65. The longer you delay, the larger your pension payment will be each month.

After age 70, there is no advantage in delaying your first payment. In fact, you risk losing benefits. If you are over the age of 70 and are not receiving an Old Age Security pension, apply now.

If you are eligible for the Guaranteed Income Supplement, there is also no advantage in delaying your first payment.

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When A Husband Dies Does The Wife Get His Social Security

When a retired employee dies, the surviving partner receives a quantity identical to the employees complete retirement benefit. Example: John Smith has a $1,200-a-month retirement benefit. His spouse Jane receives $six hundred as a 50% spousal benefit. Total own circle of relative profits from Social Security is $1,800 a month.

A widowed spouse receives 100 percent of the deceased workers benefit amount of full retirement age or older. A widowed spouse receives between 71 and 99 percent of the basic amount of the worker who dies at age 60 full retirement age.

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Bankrate follows a strict editorial policy, so you can trust that were putting your interests first. All of our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts, who ensure everything we publish is objective, accurate and trustworthy.

Our reporters and editors focus on the points consumers care about most how to save for retirement, understanding the types of accounts, how to choose investments and more so you can feel confident when planning for your future.

What To Consider Before Filing For Social Security

Can I Collect Social Security and Unemployment at the Same ...

A larger benefit check sounds great, but there are tradeoffs, and soon-to-retire folks should consider multiple issues before they decide one way or the other on when to file. If you really want to consider all the avenues, then youll have to think about your finances and longevity two issues that people have a hard time grappling with.

But heres the key trade-off: you can file early and take a reduced benefit, expecting that a shorter life span will mean you receive more now, or you could file at full retirement age or later and claim a bigger check, and eventually live long enough to claim more than the first approach.

Social Security is like longevity insurance, says Brent Neiser, a Certified Financial Planner and former chair of the Consumer Advisory Board at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Its a stream of payments that will not stop throughout your life, so delaying your benefits to keep those payments as large as possible forms a helpful base to your retirement plan.

Neiser urges those who have not saved enough for retirement to use whatever means possible to postpone their Social Security benefits until after their full retirement age to help boost their future income.

You can use personal savings to help bridge the gap, but ideally you should plan to work a little longer , Neiser says.

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Social Security And Disability Eligibility

Also known as Supplemental Security Income , you can receive Social Security retirement benefits as long as youre at least 62 years old and have at least 40 work credits. Work credits are earned when you pay Social Security taxes on income you earned from a job or from self-employment. Youll be eligible to earn these benefits at the early retirement age or the full retirement age. The full retirement age varies depending on when you were born. For instance, the full retirement age is 66 if you were born from 1943 to 1954, according to the Social Security Administration . Full retirement age is 67 for anyone born after 1960, but you can opt for early retirement benefits at age 62.

For disability, the age requirements are quite different. You only need to be at least 18 years of age to qualify, and SSA guidelines require you to prove that:

  • You cant do the work that youve done before
  • You cant adjust to other work because of your medical condition
  • Your disability has lasted or will last for at least one year or result in death

For example, if you are working in 2020 and making more than $1,260 a month, you wont be considered disabled.

What If I Delay Taking My Benefits

If you retire sometime between your full retirement age and age 70, you typically earn a “delayed retirement” credit . For example, say you were born in 1955 and your full retirement age is 66 and 2 months. If you started your benefits at age 68, you would receive a credit of 8% per year multiplied by approximately two . This makes your benefit ~15% higher than the amount you would have received at age 66.

That higher baseline lasts for the rest of your retirement and serves as the basis for future increases linked to inflation. While it’s important to consider your personal circumstancesit’s not always possible to wait, particularly if you are in poor health or can’t afford to delaythe benefits of waiting can be significant.

If you decide to wait past age 65, you may still need to sign up for Medicare. In some circumstancesyour Medicare coverage may be delayed and cost more if you do not sign up at age 65.

Effect of late retirement on benefits

1.Represents Full Retirement Age based on DOB Jan. 2, 1955

2.PIA = The primary insurance amount is the basis for benefits that are paid to an individual

To review your situation, your annual Social Security statement will list your projected benefits at age 62, full retirement age, and age 70, assuming you continue to work and earn about the same amount until age 62, full retirement age, or age 70 before retiring. If you need a copy of your annual statement, you can request one from the Social Security Administration .

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