Thursday, June 16, 2022

What Age Do You Start Collecting Social Security

Don't Miss

Do Survivor Benefits Increase After Full Retirement Age

When Can I Start Collecting My Social Security

If you are the surviving spouse who is claiming benefits based on your deceased partner’s work record, there is no benefit to waiting until after FRA to claim your benefits. You do not earn delayed retirement credits, so your benefit will not increase.

However, if you are the higher-earning spouse, delaying your claim for benefits until after FRA can result in your widow receiving more monthly income, as your widowed partner will receive the higher of the two monthly benefits you were each receiving.

Financial Benefits Of Working Longer

Many people want to retire as soon as it is financially feasible to do so, but it’s crucial to consider the earning and investing power you may give up if you stop working full-time and take Social Security at 62. If you leave a job with good pay and benefits, it may be difficult ever to regain that level of compensation if you need or want to return to work later. Of course, not everyone can keep working, but it is something to consider if you are healthy and have the opportunity to stay in the workforce, in either a full-time or part-time capacity.

The compensation benefits of your job could also affect your Social Security. Some companies allow stock awards to continue to vest after retirement date, and even into years to follow. These payouts are considered income, and could cause your Social Security payment to be taxed, or taxed at a higher level than in years after the awards have fully distributed. Delaying Social Security payments until those other income sources have been reported for tax purposes is worth consideration.

But there’s even more to the story. As you approach retirement, you’re often at the upper end of your lifetime earnings trajectoryand of your ability to save more for retirement. In addition, if you can keep working, you can make “catch-up” contributions to a tax-deferred workplace savings plan like a 401 or 403 or a traditional or Roth IRA. Catch-up contributions allow you to set aside larger amounts of money for retirement.

Doing A Breakeven Analysis And Other Ways To Decide How Soon To Start

    InvestopediaForbes AdvisorThe Motley Fool, CredibleInsider

        A Tea Reader: Living Life One Cup at a Time

        If youre about to retire, you may be wondering whether you should start claiming your hard-earned Social Security benefits now. Here are a few key factors to consider in making that decision.

        Recommended Reading: How Much Will I Make From Social Security

        What A Social Security Break

        In a nutshell, a Social Security break-even calculator can tell you when the best age is to start taking Social security benefits, in terms of how much money you could expect to receive over time. Going back to the previous example, lets assume that you track your benefit amounts over a 10-year, 20-year and 30-year period. Heres how your total benefits received would look over each of those periods, for all three starting points.

        Your cumulative benefits after 10 years:

        • $144,000, starting at age 62
        • $122,400, starting at age 66
        • $52,800, starting at age 70

        Your cumulative benefits after 20 years:

        • $288,000, starting at age 62
        • $326,400, starting at age 66
        • $316,800, starting at age 70

        Your cumulative benefits after 30 years:

        • $432,000, starting at age 62
        • $530,400, starting at age 66
        • $580,800, starting at age 70

        You can see that youd draw the most Social Security benefits in total if you wait until age 70 to start taking them, assuming you live to age 100. But that could be a big if when youre not in the best health.

        What you have to keep in mind when using a Social Security break-even calculator is that the numbers are hypothetical. They dont take into things that could affect your ability to draw benefits or how far those benefits might go, such as:

        Waiting To Receive Social Security Benefits

        I was born in 1964. When will I be able to start collecting my Social ...

        If you delay receiving Social Security benefits until after your full retirement age, you will get benefit credits that increase the amount you receive once you do start. But that increase stops once you’ve reached age 70.

        For example, if your full retirement age is 67, you would receive an 8% increase each year that you postpone receiving your benefits until you reach age 70. However, if you delay receiving your benefits, you must still apply for Medicare before age 65. You can start the process during your initial enrollment period. This period lasts seven months: three months before the month of your 65th birthday, the month of your 65th birthday and through the third month after your 65th birthday.

        If you miss your initial enrollment or don’t enroll in Medicare Part B because you have coverage through work or a spouse, you may have opportunities to enroll later.

        If you don’t sign up for Medicare Part B during your initial enrollment period and don’t have other coverage, you could be charged a penalty of 10% for each year you delayed enrollment once you do enroll.

        Don’t Miss: How Much Is Social Security Check

        The Best Age For Social Security Retirement Benefits

        As you get older, you start thinking more about retirement distributions than contributions. One of the biggest questions that near-retirees have is, What is the best age to start collecting Social Security benefits? Most take the benefits right away, but that isnt always the best option. A financial advisor can help you optimize a plan for your retirement needs. You can start collecting Social Security benefits any time between ages 62 and 70. Lets take a look at how Social Security works, and what you need to know when deciding the best age for your retirement.

        The best age for Social Security benefits depends on personal and financial factors, like your current cash needs, retirement plans, health and family history. Be sure you weigh the decision carefully and dont hesitate to find a financial advisor to talk to if need be. The age you choose to start taking Social Security will affect the monthly amount you receive for the rest of your life.

        When Can You Begin To Claim Social Security Survivor Benefits

        Survivor benefits to family members from a contributor depend on the age when that worker died, with fewer credits needed the younger the worker dies. The Social Security Administration has a special rule whereby the surviving children, and spouse who is caring for the children can receive survivors benefits after the worker has attained just six credits in the three years prior to his or her death.

        The Social Security Administration will continue to pay survivors of someone already receiving retirement or disability benefits at the time of their death based on that entitlement.

        Read Also: How To Check How Much Social Security I Will Get

        Learn About Retirement Benefits

        We want you to know what Social Security can mean for you and your familys financial future. In this section, you can learn how Social Security works, whos eligible for retirement benefits, and what to consider before applying. Read on to understand how Social Security fits into your retirement plan.

        How To Get A Social Security Card

        How much your Social Security benefits will be if you make $30,000, $35,000 or $40,000
      • Gather your documents. Learn what documents you’ll need to get a card. Select your situation:
      • Adult or child
      • Original, replacement, or corrected card
      • U.S. born citizen, foreign born U.S. citizen, or noncitizen
      • Apply online for a replacement card. Apply online if youre not changing anything on your card and you are eligible. This option is available in most states. You will need to make a my Social Security account first. Or complete an application. If you can not apply online, fill out an application and return it to the SSA. Find out where to take it in person or mail it.
      • Don’t Miss: My Social Secirity

        Age 70 Is When Your Potential Retirement Benefits Reach Their Maximum

        Though 62 remains the most popular age to start collecting Social Security, there are plenty of filers who opt to take their benefits later. Some choose to wait until full retirement age in order to avoid a reduction in payments. Others might opt to wait even longer and accrue delayed retirement credits in the process. But there comes a point where it no longer pays to hold off on filing for benefits — specifically, age 70. Though you’re not compelled to sign up for Social Security at that time, delaying will only cause you to lose money — money you’re entitled to.

        No More File And Suspend

        Note that the claiming strategy called file and suspend, which allowed married couples who have reached their FRA to receive spousal benefits and delayed retirement credits at the same time, ended as of May 1, 2016. However, spouses born before Jan. 2, 1954, who have attained their FRA may still be able to file a restricted application. It allows them to claim spousal benefits while delaying their own benefits up to age 70.

        Social Security benefits can be taxable if your combined income is high enough.

        Recommended Reading: How Can I Get Money From My Social Security

        Taxes On Your Benefits

        Your Social Security benefits may be partially taxable if your combined income exceeds certain thresholds. Regardless of how much you make, the first 15% of your benefits are not taxed.

        The SSA defines combined income using this formula:

        • Your adjusted gross income + nontaxable interest + half of your Social Security benefits = your combined income

        If you file your federal tax return as an individual and your combined income is $25,000 to $34,000, then you may have to pay income tax on up to 50% of your benefits. If your combined income is more than $34,000, you may have to pay tax on up to 85% of your benefits.

        If youre married, filing a joint return, and your combined income is $32,000 to $44,000, then you may have to pay income tax on up to 50% of your benefits. If your combined income is more than $44,000, you may have to pay tax on up to 85% of your benefits.

        Watch Out For Hidden Costs

        What Age Can You Start Collecting Social Security

        Youll also want to consider other lifestyle factors, especially Medicare. Americans become eligible for federal health insurance coverage at age 65, well after when you can begin to file for Social Security.

        If you stop working at age 62 and lose health insurance, you have to get supplemental insurance to bridge the gap until you turn 65 and Medicare kicks in, Neiser says.

        If you work during retirement, you have another incentive to delay collecting Social Security. Earning too much at a job after you begin collecting your benefit can reduce your payout, but only if you have yet to hit full retirement age.

        However, when you hit full retirement age, your benefit will increase to account for any benefit that was withheld earlier due to working. Heres how much you can earn and not get hit.

        If youre younger than full retirement age for all of 2021, the Social Security Administration will deduct $1 of your monthly check for every $2 you earn above $18,960 per year.

        If you reach full retirement age in 2021, the administration deducts $1 of your monthly check for every $3 you earn above $50,520 until the month you reach retirement age.

        Youll also owe Social Security and Medicare tax on your earnings, even if youre already receiving benefits.

        So those are some potential pitfalls to claiming Social Security early.

        Also Check: Social Sequrity

        Earn Ssa Work Credits In Some Countries

        You may not have enough credits from your work in the United States to qualify for retirement benefits. But, you may be able to count your work credits from another country. The SSA has agreements with 24 countries. If you earned credits in one of those countries, they can help you qualify for U.S. benefits.

        How To Stop Social Security Check Payments

        The SSA can not pay benefits for the month of a recipients death. That means if the person died in July, the check received in August must be returned. Find out how to return a check to the SSA.

        If the payment is by direct deposit, notify the financial institution as soon as possible so it can return any payments received after death. For more about the requirement to return benefits for the month of a beneficiarys death, see the top of page 11 of this SSA publication.

        Family members may be eligible for Social Security survivors benefits when a person getting benefits dies. Visit the SSA’s Survivors Benefits page to learn more.

        Recommended Reading: Look Up Someone By Social Security Number

        You Have A Shorter Life Expectancy

        The government incentivizes waiting to collect your Social Security benefits by giving you a larger monthly amount the longer you delay. For example, if you start collecting benefits at age 62 when your full retirement age is 66, your monthly benefit will be about 75% of your full-age benefit. So if you expected your monthly benefit to be $1,000 per month at 66, you would only receive around $750 at 62.

        Although a larger monthly benefit might sound great, keep in mind that youd have to wait four years to get that extra $250 per month. You would receive $36,000 during those four years at the reduced amount of $750 per month.

        When you start collecting $1,000 at age 66, that extra $250 per month wont let you break even for 12 years compared to collecting early. If your health is declining and you dont expect to live until youre 78, youll receive more in benefits during your lifetime if you start claiming as soon as possible.

        How To Calculate The Social Security Breakeven Age

        Should you take your Social Security benefits at age 62?

        Your Social Security breakeven age is the point in your life when the total of those lower benefits comes to equal the total of benefits that you would have received if you had waited to take your benefits at FRA, or even later.

        For example, if you were born in 1960, your FRA is 67. If you choose to begin receiving Social Security income at age 62, which will be in 2022, then your FRA benefit will be reduced by 30%. Assuming that the full monthly benefit would be $1,000, you will be left with a monthly Social Security check of only $700.

        If a co-worker with the same birth date and similar earnings history elects to receive their benefit at FRA five years later, then their benefit will be $1,000 each month. For the first five years, you received a total of $42,000 , while your co-worker received nothing, so you are ahead. Once your co-worker starts receiving benefits, however, they get $300 more each monthor $3,600 more each yearthan you do. So when will your co-worker catch up to you in total benefits?

        Lets divide the amount by which you are ahead by the higher amount per year that your co-worker receives. The answer is when you are both 78 years and eight months, or 11.67 years after your FRA. After this point, your co-worker will earn more over their lifetime than you will.

        Don’t Miss: At What Age Do I Get Social Security

        Spouses And Social Security

        You can claim Social Security benefits based on your spouse’s work record. If claiming spousal benefits provides more, claiming before your FRA on a spouse’s record means you’ll lose even more than claiming on your own recordthe benefit reduction for a spouse is up to 35% while the reduction for claiming your own benefit is up to 30%. For instance, if you’re the spouse of Colleen in the above example and you are the same age, you’d be eligible for only $650 a month at age 6235% less than the $1000 a month you would get at your FRA of 67.

        Not married? Read Viewpoints on Fidelity.com: Social Security tips for singles

        Your decision to take benefits early could outlive you. If you were to die before your spouse, they would be eligible to receive your monthly amount as a survivor benefitif it’s higher than their own amount. But if you take your benefits early, say at age 62 versus waiting until age 70, your spouse’s survivor Social Security benefit could be up to 30% less for the remainder of their lifetime.

        Collecting Social Security Before Or After Your Full Retirement Age

        If you begin collecting Social Security at age 62 and your full retirement age is 66, the check you receive will be about one-quarter less than the amount you would have received at full retirement age. If you are the sole breadwinner in your household, your spouse could be negatively affected as well. If you begin collecting before your full retirement age, the amount of money your spouse would receive after your death decreases.

        Read Also: How Can I Find My Deceased Father’s Social Security Number

        Whats Your Social Security Break

        If youre looking to maximize your total lifetime Social Security payout, youll want to conduct a break-even analysis to determine when you should start drawing your benefits.

        Your break-even age occurs when the total value of higher benefits starts to exceed the total value of lower benefits .

        For example, if you are eligible to collect a reduced $900 benefit at age 62 plus 1 month, and your benefit would increase to $1,251 at age 65 and 10 months, your estimated break-even age is 75 years and 5 months.

        If you expect to live beyond that age, it could make financial sense to delay drawing benefits. The Social Security Administrations life expectancy calculator can help you decide.

        When it comes to calculating a start date for Social Security benefits, however, theres not an age thats appropriate for everyone. Consider your own financial needs, health and other retirement plans before making the call. If you cant reasonably afford to live without taking benefits, it may make little sense to delay taking your benefit.

        More articles

        Popular Articles