Thursday, June 30, 2022

What Age For Retirement Social Security

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No More File And Suspend

Webinar: Planning your Social Security claiming age (retirement tool demo) â consumerfinance.gov

Note that the claiming strategy called file and suspend, which allowed married couples who have reached their FRA to receive spousal benefits and delayed retirement credits at the same time, ended as of May 1, 2016. However, spouses born before Jan. 2, 1954, who have attained their FRA may still be able to file a restricted application. It allows them to claim spousal benefits while delaying their own benefits up to age 70.

Social Security benefits can be taxable if your combined income is high enough.

Increase For Delayed Retirement

8.0%2/3 of 1%

If you’ve already reached full retirement age, you can choose to start receiving benefits before the month you apply. However, we cannot pay retroactive benefits for any month before you reached full retirement age or more than six months in the past.

If you decide to delay your retirement, be sure to sign up for just Medicare at age 65.

If you do not sign up at age 65, in some circumstances your Medicare coverage may be delayed and cost more.

If you retire before age 70, some of your delayed retirement credits will not be applied until the January after you start receiving benefits.

For example, if you reach your full retirement age in June, you may plan to wait until your 69th birthday to start your retirement benefits. Your initial benefit amount will reflect delayed retirement credits earned from your full retirement age through the year before your 69th birthday. In January of the following calendar year, your benefit will increase for the credits earned in the year of your 69th birthday. Our Online Calculator gives you an estimate with all credits applied for comparison purposes.

Is Your Full Retirement Age Affected By Where You Live

Your FRA is not affected by where you live. Most Social Security rules, including those that determine benefit amount and claiming age, are set by federal law. However, some states do tax Social Security benefits, so where you live can affect tax levels on your retirement income. But again, the age at which you claim benefits won’t affect your tax rate — your income is the key factor.

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Does Working After Full Retirement Age Increase Social Security Benefits

Working after full retirement age could increase your Social Security benefits. Your benefits are based on average wages over your 35 highest-earning years .

Even after you’ve reached full retirement age, and even if you’ve already claimed benefits, the Social Security Administration continues to recalculate your average annual wage to account for new income. If your earnings after FRA are higher than previous years and raise your average wage for your 35 top-earning years, your benefits could rise accordingly.

Defining The Social Security Break

Raising Social Securitys Retirement Age Cuts Benefits for All Retirees ...

Your Social Security break-even age represents, in theory, the ideal point in time to apply for benefits in order to maximize them.

Remember, you can begin taking your benefits at age 62 at a reduced amount. But by taking your benefits at this earlier age, youll receive more Social Security checks over your lifetime assuming you reach your desired life expectancy.

On the other hand, delaying your benefits past full retirement age increases them year over year until you reach age 70. Currently, the full retirement age for most people is either 66 or 67 years old, based on Social Security Administration guidelines. If you wait until age 70 to start claiming your benefits, youd receive 132% of your regular monthly benefit amount. So the trade-off is receiving fewer checks from Social Security but the ones you do get would be larger.

Your break-even age is the point at which youd come out ahead by delaying Social Security benefits. Your actual Social Security break-even age can depend on the amount of benefits youre eligible to receive, your tax situation and things like how inflation might affect the purchasing power of your benefits.

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Claiming Social Security At Age 66

If you were born between 1943 and 1954, your Full Retirement Age is 66. Claiming at your Full Retirement Age will entitle you to your full benefit amount, but you can still wait to claim. If you wait further, you will garner delayed retirement benefits, which will increase your monthly benefit when you do start collecting.

At Full Retirement Age you can work without any deductions from your benefit amount. However, you may still be taxed on your benefit if you have other substantial income such as wages, self-employment, interest, or dividends. If so, the Internal Revenue Service taxes your combined income which is your adjusted gross income, plus nontaxable interest, plus half of your Social Security benefits.

If you file a federal tax return as an individual and your combined income is between $25,000 and $34,000, you will have to pay income tax on up to half your benefits. If your income is more than $34,000, up to 85 percent of your benefits might be taxable.

If you are married and file a joint return, and your income together is between $32,000 and $44,000, you may have to pay income tax on up to half your benefits. If your income exceeds $44,000 you may have to pay income tax on up to 85 percent of your benefits.

Do Survivor Benefits Increase After Full Retirement Age

If you are the surviving spouse who is claiming benefits based on your deceased partner’s work record, there is no benefit to waiting until after FRA to claim your benefits. You do not earn delayed retirement credits, so your benefit will not increase.

However, if you are the higher-earning spouse, delaying your claim for benefits until after FRA can result in your widow receiving more monthly income, as your widowed partner will receive the higher of the two monthly benefits you were each receiving.

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Age : Wait And Accumulate Delayed Retirement Credits

At 70, you will get the maximum amount of benefits that you can get from Social Security. It does not make sense to delay your Social Security retirement age past 70 because your benefit amount will not increase. Waiting until 70 to begin your Social Security if you are married and are the higher earner results in a higher survivor benefit for your spouse.

How Should I Decide When To Take Benefits

What is the Full Retirement Age for Social Security?

Consider the following factors as you decide when to take Social Security.

Your cash needs: If you’re contemplating early retirement and you have sufficient resources , you can be flexible about when to take Social Security benefits.

If you’ll need your Social Security benefits to make ends meet, you may have fewer options. If possible, you may want to consider postponing retirement or work part-time until you reach your full retirement ageor even longer so that you can maximize your benefits.

Your life expectancy and break-even age: Taking Social Security early reduces your benefits, but you’ll also receive monthly checks for a longer period of time. On the other hand, taking Social Security later results in fewer checks during your lifetime, but the credit for waiting means each check will be larger.

At what age will you break even and begin to come out ahead if you delay Social Security? The break-even age depends on the amount of your benefits and the assumptions you use to account for taxes and the opportunity cost of waiting . The SSA has several handy calculators you can use to estimate your own benefits.

If you think you’ll beat the average life expectancy, then waiting for a larger monthly check might be a good deal. On the other hand, if you’re in poor health or have reason to believe you won’t beat the average life expectancy, you might decide to take what you can while you can.

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Social Security Retirement Age : If You Are A Widow/widower

If you are a widow or widower, you can receive Social Security retirement benefits as early as 60. If you have not reached your full retirement age, and you are still working and earn more than the earnings limit, your benefits will be reduced. Once you reach full retirement age, no more reductions will apply, regardless of how much you work and earn. Those working will want to consider waiting until their full retirement age to begin widow/widower benefits.

One option available to widows/widowers is to file a restricted application, which means you can begin one type of benefit, such as a survivor benefit then when you reach 70, you can switch over to your retirement benefit amount if it would be larger.

How The Retirement Age Could Change

Retirement ages were last altered in 1983 under then-President Ronald Reagan.

Those changes, which raised the full retirement age to 67 from 65, are still being phased in today.

Even just the bump up to age 66 from 65 represented a 5% benefit cut, Elsasser noted.

Many experts expect that any future changes could push up the Social Security retirement age. Notably, the Social Security 2100 Act: A Sacred Trust, introduced by Rep. John Larson, D-Conn., last year, would leave those thresholds unchanged and, in some respects, make benefits more generous. But the legislation has a five-year timeframe.

Separately, the Social Security Administration has scored the financial effects other proposals to change the age thresholds could have on the program.

Just in 20 years, we’ve seen a substantial increase in the retirement age.Mark J. Warshawskysenior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute

“I expect that at some point in the not too distant future, Congress will agree on a Social Security package that includes some type of adjustment to the retirement age,” Akabas said. “Whether that’s in two years or 10 years, it’s very difficult to predict.”

Experts say it’s possible the full retirement age could get pushed up by a year or two, which could be gradually phased in.

Additionally, lawmakers could also raise the initial age for eligibility for retirement benefits from 62, as well as the highest age for delaying benefits and earning benefit increases from 70.

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You Expect Your Investments To Grow Faster Than The Increased Benefit

If youre the next Warren Buffet, its possible you could do better taking Social Security early and investing the money than you could by waiting to take a larger benefit later. When weighing the best decision, consider the inflation rate, the rate your benefits increase and how much you can expect to earn in your portfolio. Given that benefits increase by 8 percent per year for each year you wait after full retirement age, however, its hard to outperform that rate of increase in the market. These safe investments do have high returns.

Taxes On Your Benefits

Social Security Age Chart: When to Start Drawing Bene...

Your Social Security benefits may be partially taxable if your combined income exceeds certain thresholds. Regardless of how much you make, the first 15% of your benefits are not taxed.

The SSA defines combined income using this formula:

  • Your adjusted gross income + nontaxable interest + half of your Social Security benefits = your combined income

If you file your federal tax return as an individual and your combined income is $25,000 to $34,000, then you may have to pay income tax on up to 50% of your benefits. If your combined income is more than $34,000, you may have to pay tax on up to 85% of your benefits.

If youre married, filing a joint return, and your combined income is $32,000 to $44,000, then you may have to pay income tax on up to 50% of your benefits. If your combined income is more than $44,000, you may have to pay tax on up to 85% of your benefits.

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How Does Your Age Impact Your Benefit

If you take Social Security at your full retirement age , you’ll receive your standard benefit. But you can take it as early as age 62 or delay it until age 70. If you take it early, you’ll receive less for every year that you take it sooner, and you’ll get an increase in your benefit for every year that you delay it. So if your standard benefit at your FRA at age 66 is $2,500, your reduced benefit at age 62 will be $1,875 and your delayed benefit at age 70 will be $3,300.

If you live to the age of 75, taking it at age 62 will get you $292,500 in lifetime income. If you take it at age 66, you’ll get $270,000, and if you delay to age 70, you’ll get $198,000. If your life expectancy extends to age 80, you’ll receive $405,000 if you take it at age 62, $420,000 if you take it at age 66, and $396,000 if you take it at age 70. If you live until the age of 85, you’ll draw $517,500 in lifetime income if you take it at age 62, $570,00 from taking it at age 66, and $594,000 if you take it at age 70.

Can I Work After Full Retirement Age

Beneficiaries are free to continue working while taking their Social Security benefits, no matter what age they start taking those benefits. However, working and taking Social Security benefits before reaching full retirement age may affect your benefits.

If you start taking Social Security early but keep working, youre subject to whats called an earnings test. For every $2 you earn over $18,960, you will see $1 withheld in Social Security benefits. And in the year you reach full retirement age, this limit changes to $1 in benefits for every $3 you earn above $50,520 up to the month of your birthday.

Once you reach full retirement age, though, you can keep every dollar of your Social Security benefits, no matter how much income you bring in. Your future benefits will also be adjusted to include the money that the earnings test previously factored out.

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No One Else Is Relying On Your Benefits

In the event of your death, a surviving spouse, minor or disabled child can receive money from the Social Security Administration based on the amount of your benefits. For example, a surviving spouse can receive between 71.5% and 100% of your benefit amount, depending on the surviving spouses age. A disabled child can receive 75% of your benefits each month even after youre gone.

If no one else can qualify for benefits based on your record, you might want to retire early because no one is depending on that money. If everything else falls into place and you meet the minimum Social Security retirement age, consider collecting your benefits early and enjoying life.

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What Else Affects Your Retirement Benefits

The Full Retirement Age for Social Security Answered

Everyones retirement is unique. Beyond deciding when to begin receiving retirement benefits, other factors that can affect your benefits include whether you continue to work, what type of job you had, and if you have a pension from certain jobs.

Continuing To Work

You can choose to keep working beyond your full retirement age. If you do, you can increase your future Social Security benefits. Each extra year you work adds another year of earnings to your Social Security record. Higher lifetime earnings can mean higher benefits when you choose to receive benefits.

Specific Types Of Earnings

While Social Security earnings are calculated the same way for most American workers, there are some types of earnings that have additional rules.

Earning types with special rules include:

Pensions And Other Factors

Pensions and taxes have the potential to impact your retirement benefit. Review the resources below on pensions and other factors you should consider:

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Financial Benefits Of Working Longer

Many people want to retire as soon as it is financially feasible to do so, but it’s crucial to consider the earning and investing power you may give up if you stop working full-time and take Social Security at 62. If you leave a job with good pay and benefits, it may be difficult ever to regain that level of compensation if you need or want to return to work later. Of course, not everyone can keep working, but it is something to consider if you are healthy and have the opportunity to stay in the workforce, in either a full-time or part-time capacity.

The compensation benefits of your job could also affect your Social Security. Some companies allow stock awards to continue to vest after retirement date, and even into years to follow. These payouts are considered income, and could cause your Social Security payment to be taxed, or taxed at a higher level than in years after the awards have fully distributed. Delaying Social Security payments until those other income sources have been reported for tax purposes is worth consideration.

But there’s even more to the story. As you approach retirement, you’re often at the upper end of your lifetime earnings trajectoryand of your ability to save more for retirement. In addition, if you can keep working, you can make “catch-up” contributions to a tax-deferred workplace savings plan like a 401 or 403 or a traditional or Roth IRA. Catch-up contributions allow you to set aside larger amounts of money for retirement.

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