Wednesday, September 28, 2022

What Are The Requirements To Get Social Security Disability

Don't Miss

Social Security Disability Work Incentives

I Missed the 60 Day Appeal Deadline for my SSDI Claim – What Can I Do

Special rules make it possible for those receiving SSDI benefits to go back to work while continuing to be paid the monthly benefits. This is for those workers whose disability is not life threatening and have some capacity to work.

Three incentives are offered by SSDI for people attempting to go back to work: trial work period, extended period of eligibility, and expedited reinstatement.

Is Your Condition Found In The List Of Disabling Conditions

For each of the major body systems, we maintain a list of medical conditions that we consider severe enough that it prevents a person from doing substantial gainful activity. If your condition is not on the list, we have to decide if it is as severe as a medical condition that is on the list. If it is, we will find that you are disabled. If it is not, we then go to Step 4.

We have two initiatives designed to expedite our processing of new disability claims:

  • Compassionate Allowances: Certain cases that usually qualify for disability can be allowed as soon as the diagnosis is confirmed. Examples include acute leukemia, Lou Gehrigs disease , and pancreatic cancer.
  • Quick Disability Determinations: We use sophisticated computer screening to identify cases with a high probability of allowance.

For more information about our disability claims process, visit our Benefits For People With Disabilities website.

Listing 200 Special Senses And Speech

Many times, sense and speech issues will not qualify for SSD benefits, however, there are a few exceptions that do qualify. These disabilities include the sudden onset of blindness and/or loss ofhearing, the loss of speech making the individual unable to be heard or understood, and conditions that impair the loss of balance such as Menieres Disease. View full Blue Book List here

You May Like: Locate Someone By Social Security Number

What Is The Listing Of Impairments

The Listing of Impairments is a list of conditions or health problems the SSA has prepared that are usually considered severe enough to allow you to qualify for benefits. It’s divided into Part A, which lists adult conditions, and Part B, which lists children’s conditions.

Within each part, there are specific categories of medical ailments that deal with different parts of the body, including:

  • The Musculoskeletal System
  • Congenital Disorders that Affect Multiple Body Systems
  • Neurological Disorders
  • Cancer
  • Immune System Disorders

In each of these individual subsections are diseases, disorders, and medical problems that the SSA believes may allow you to qualify for benefits. However, having a listed condition still isn’t enough. The SSA also lists specific symptoms you must exhibit or criteria you must meet to qualify for benefits based on that condition.

For example, to qualify for disability benefits based on chronic heart failure, you must be undergoing treatment and still have medically documented proof of systolic or diastolic failure. The SSA even defines exactly what it considers to be systolic or diastolic failure.

The chronic heart failure also must result in: persistent symptoms of heart failure that interfere with daily living three or more separate episodes of acute congestive heart failure over a consecutive 12-month period or an inability to perform an exercise tolerance test for specified reasons, such as chest discomfort.

Find Out How Much Social Security Disability Benefits Are Worth And How To Apply For Them

How to Get Social Security Disability Benefits

Anyone can become temporarily or permanently disabled. In fact, many experts believe that Americans in their 20s today have about a 30% chance of experiencing a disabling condition severe enough to cause at least three months of missed work before they retire. Yet despite the significant risk of disability, most Americans have neither short-term nor long-term disability insurance.

If you sustain an illness or injury that leaves you unable to work, what can you do? One option is to apply for monthly disability benefits through the Social Security Administration, which also provides retirement benefits to seniors. However, qualifying for Social Security disability benefits can be complicated, and the bar for qualifying is set fairly high.

If you think you may come to rely on Social Security disability benefits — or if you simply want to find out how they work — this complete guide will provide the answers you need.

Read Also: 154 Pierrepont Street Social Security Hours

Do You Qualify For Social Security Disability Insurance Benefits In New York

Social security disability insurance is a government program that pays monthly benefits to cover costs of living for those that are unable to work due to a debilitating illness or disability. This helps thousands each year who are unable to earn the wages needed to support themselves.

However, qualification process for SSDI is complex, and can be difficult to navigate. This is to ensure that only those that need compensation from SSDI benefits are able to receive it. Read on to determine if you are eligible for SSDI in New York, and how to apply.

Recommended Reading: How Much Does Disability Pay In Ny

Ive Heard That My Ssdi Payments May Be Reduced If I Receive Other Benefits How Does This Happen

If you receive other disability benefits such as Workers Compensation, your benefits may be recalculated or reduced. This may take place based on the SSDI index which is also the same index used to compute all Social Security benefits. The SSDI index looks at average wage indexes and applies them to a beneficiarys average current earnings.

Don’t Miss: How To Get A New Ss Card After Marriage

Other Ways You Can Apply

Apply With Your Local Office

You can do most of your business with Social Security online. If you cannot use these online services, your local Social Security office can help you apply. Although our offices are closed to the public, employees from those offices are assisting people by telephone. You can find the phone number for your local office by using our Office Locator and looking under Social Security Office Information. The toll-free Office number is your local office.

Apply By Phone

If You Do Not Live in the U.S. Or One of Its Territories

Contact the if you live outside the U.S. or a U.S. territory and wish to apply for retirement benefits.

Mailing Your Documents

If you mail any documents to us, you must include the Social Security number so that we can match them with the correct application. Do not write anything on the original documents. Please write the Social Security number on a separate sheet of paper and include it in the mailing envelope along with the documents.

Is My Spouse Eligible To Receive Social Security Spousal Benefits

What are the minimum requirements for Social Security Disability Benefits

Spouses are eligible to receive 50 percent of their spouses full retirement benefit if they wait until they reach full retirement age. If they apply for a spousal retirement benefit before that time, the amount is pro-rated, depending on the age at which the spouse applies. For example:

If a spouse applies for a spousal retirement benefit at age 62 and the full retirement benefit is age 67, the applicant will get 32.5 percent of the spousal benefit.

If a spouse applies for a spousal retirement benefit at age 62 and the full retirement benefit is age 65, the applicant will get 37.5 percent of the spousal benefit.

The benefit increases as ages go up, to a maximum of 50 percent at full retirement age. It should also be noted that only one spouse can apply for a spouses benefit when a couple is married.

In cases of divorce, the divorced spouse can get retirement benefits on the spouses record if the marriage lasted for at least 10 years. To collect this benefit, the spouse must be at least 62 years old and not married. That benefit does not impact the amount a spouse and their current married partner can get.

Recommended Reading: What Will Social Security Pay

You Earn Too Much Income

For SSDI, which is the benefit program for workers who have paid into the Social Security system over multiple years, one of the most basic reasons you could be denied benefits is that, when you apply, you are working above the limit where it is considered “substantial gainful activity” . This means you earn too much money to be considered disabled. You are allowed to work a small amount when you’re applying for and collecting SSDI, but not over the SGA limit, which is $1,310 per month in 2021 . The figure is adjusted annually. Income from investments does not count toward the SGAonly work income counts, as it shows your ability to work.

As to SSI, which is the disability benefit for low-income people, when you apply for SSI, you can’t be making over the substantial gainful activity level . But there’s a limit on all earned and unearned income for SSI, around $1,600 per month, that applies both when you’re applying for benefits and when you’re collecting benefits. And any time your income is over $85 per month, your SSI payment will start to be reduced, by a somewhat complicated formula. If you make more than about $1,650, your payment would be reduced to zero in other words, you won’t qualify for SSI.

Can You Receive Retroactive Payments

Once the SSA approves your SSDI application and calculates your monthly benefit, you may be entitled to a back pay award. How many months of payments you will receive will depend on the date you applied for benefits and your disability onset date.

If you are applying for SSDI benefits, you need the assistance of a skilled Social Security disability lawyer to get your application approved and receive the benefits you deserve. To schedule a free consultation with a member of our legal team, fill out the online form on this page or call our Roswell office today.

Related Links:

Don’t Miss: How Much Social Security Can I Draw

Can I Receive Both Ssi And Ssdi At The Same Time

Can I Receive both SSI and SSDI at the Same Time?

In some circumstances, you can receive both Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability Insurance benefits at the same time. This is commonly referred to as concurrent benefits. To receive concurrent benefits, you must be approved for SSDI, but receive low monthly payments through the program.

A low monthly SSDI benefit is caused by several factors:

  • You have worked very little or not at all in the last 10 years
  • You had very little work history at the time you became disabled
  • You became disabled at a young age, before building a significant work history
  • You earned relatively low wages throughout the course of your employment history

All of these factors can influence the amount of SSDI benefits because payments are based on meeting minimum health eligibility requirements and having sufficient work credits built up over the course of your employment history. To learn more about work credits, .

SSI is an income-based or financial need-based program. All income from countable sources is reviewed to determine whether you meet the requirements for the SSI program.

Countable income is made up of earned income as well as several types of unearned income. SSDI payments are considered to be unearned income. In other words, any money you earn cannot exceed established minimums under the SSI program.

Special Rules For People Who Are Blind Or Have Low Vision

Getting the Letter About My Social Security Disability ...

We consider you to be legally blind under Social Security rules if your vision cannot be corrected to better than 20/200 in your better eye or if your visual field is 20 degrees or less, even with a corrective lens. Many people who meet the legal definition of blindness still have some sight and may be able to read large print and get around without a cane or a guide dog.

If you do not meet the legal definition of blindness, you may still qualify for disability benefits if your vision problems alone or combined with other health problems prevent you from working.

There are a number of special rules for people who are blind that recognize the severe impact of blindness on a person’s ability to work. For example, the monthly earnings limit for people who are blind is generally higher than the limit that applies to non-blind disabled workers.

In 2021, the monthly earnings limit is $2,190.

Don’t Miss: How To Change My Mailing Address With Social Security

How Many People Currently Receive Social Security Disability Benefits And What Is The Value Of The Benefits They Receive

About 8.8 million workers with disabilities currently receive Disability Insurance. The amount of Disability Insurance benefits that a disabled worker receives is based on his or her earnings before becoming disabled. As Table 1 shows, Disability Insurance benefits typically replace less than half of a disabled workers previous earnings.

As of March 2013, the average monthly benefit for a disabled worker was about $1,129, with male workers receiving $1,255 per month and female workers receiving $993 per month on average. About 1.9 million children of disabled workers and 160,000 spouses of disabled workers also receive supplemental benefits from Social Securityroughly $300 a month on average.

For most beneficiaries of Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security, disability benefits make up most or all of their income. For the vast majority of Disability Insurance beneficiariesabout 71 percenthalf or more of their income comes from Disability Insurance. And for nearly half of beneficiaries, 90 percent or more of their income comes from Disability Insurance. Given the modest extent to which benefits replace lost earnings and the limited sources of other income upon which they can depend, people who receive Disability Insurance are rarely able to maintain the same standard of living they had before becoming disabled. Disability Insurance provides a floor, however, that moderates the decline in their living standards.

What Are The Work History Eligibility Requirements For Ssdi

To meet the work eligibility requirements to qualify for SSDI, you must have worked long enough and recently enough to qualify. Eligibility is based on the number of work credits you have earned. For each quarter of work with income of a certain amount, you can earn one work credit.

The amount of work needed changes, but for example, in 2017, if you earn $1,700 per quarter or more in the year, you would earn four credits for the year.

How many credits you will need to qualify for benefits will depend on your age. These general rules apply:

  • Generally, you must have earned 40 work credits with 20 of them having been earned in the last 10 years.
  • If you’re younger than 31 years old, you may qualify for SSDI benefits with fewer work credits.

You May Like: Can I Locate Someone By Their Social Security Number

There Are Rules On Both Medical Eligibility And Financial Eligibility For Disability Benefits

Updated By Bethany K. Laurence, Attorney

There are several rules and requirements you must meet to be approved for Social Security disability. To be eligible for either SSDI benefits or SSI disability benefits, you must be both financially eligible and medically eligible. The Social Security Administration examines the medical issues as well as legal/financial issues and determines whether you meet the rules and requirements.

Apply For Benefits Online

Vision Problems and Social Security Disability Claims

You should apply for disability benefits as soon as you become disabled. Follow these easy steps to apply online for disability:

  • To start your application, go to our Apply for Benefits page, and read and agree to the Terms of Service. Click Next.
  • On that page, review the Getting Ready section to make sure you have the information you need to apply.
  • Select Start A New Application.
  • We will ask a few questions about who is filling out the application.
  • You will then sign into your mySocial Security account, or you will be prompted to create one.
  • Complete the application.

You can use the online application to apply for disability benefits if you:

  • Are age 18 or older.
  • Are not currently receiving benefits on your own Social Security record.
  • Are unable to work because of a medical condition that is expected to last at least 12 months or result in death and
  • Have not been denied for disability in the last 60 days.
  • Note: If your application was recently denied, our application is a starting point to request a review of the determination we made.

You may be able to file online for SSI at the same time that you file for SSDI benefits. Once you complete the online process above, a Social Security representative will contact you if we need additional information.

You May Like: How Much Do I Have To Pay Into Social Security

Listing 500 Digestive System Disorders

Digestive System Disorders specifically refer to disabilities that affect your digestive tract. While there are many digestive orders that are listed in this section that can qualify, there is a very specific set of requirements and a complex set of medical criteria that you must meet in order to receive benefits for this category. Some of the more common conditions that qualify for this category are Chronic Liver Disease, Crohns Disease, Liver Transplants, Hepatitis, Inflammatory Bowel Disease as well as Gastrointestinal Hemorrhaging that requires blood transfusions. View full Blue Book List here

Do You Have Enough Work Credits

Your disability alone is not enough to qualify you for SSDI benefits. You must have earned enough work credits during the course of your employment to be eligible for Social Security Disability Insurance benefits.

The work credits needed may vary from individual to individual, but they are basically as outlined below:

  • If you are younger than 24 years of age, you may qualify for SSDI payments if you have earned 6 work credits in the 3-year period that ended when your disability began.
  • If you are between the ages of 24 and 31, you may qualify if you have credit for working half the time between the age of 21 and the time you became disabled. For example, if you became disabled at age 25, you would need credit for 2 years of work between the ages of 21 and 25.
  • If you are older than 31 years of age, you must have the number of work credits outlined in the chart shown below. As a general rule, you must have earned at least 20 of the credits during the 10 years immediately prior to your disability onset.
If you were born after 1929 and became disabled at age:Work Credits Needed:

Don’t Miss: How Do You Find Out What Your Social Security Benefits Are

More articles

Popular Articles