Sunday, August 14, 2022

When Can You Take Full Social Security

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At What Age Can You Earn Unlimited Income On Social Security

How Can You Maximize Your Social Security

Upon reaching full retirement age, you can earn an unlimited income while still receiving Social Security. Full retirement age varies based on the year in which you were born. That age can range anywhere from 65 to 67 based on your birth year. For those born after 1960, you will have to wait until you are 67 to be considered full retirement age. However, for those born before that, you might be able to retire as early as 65.

Drawbacks To Applying For Ssdi And Retirement

This can backfire on some people, however. If you apply for early retirement but do not receive approval for your SSDI claim, you may be stuck drawing a smaller amount of retirement for the rest of your life. If this happened to you, we may be able to help you in appealing the SSDI denial. You have only 60 days to file this appeal after receiving a notice about the SSAs decision, however, so contact us as soon as possible after you receive a denial.

How Do I Apply For Social Security For The First Time

Apply online or in person. either by contacting our toll-free number, 1-800-772-1213 , or by going in person to your neighborhood Social Security office. You may also get in touch with your local Social Security office, American embassy, or American consulate if you dont reside in the United States or one of its territories.

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While You Can Start Collecting Benefits At Age 62 Should You Collect Early Or Delay

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For many elderly people, Social Security benefits make up one of their primary sources of income in retirement. For half of seniors, Social Security comprises about half of their retirement income, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Some studies estimate that without Social Security, between 30% and 40% of senior citizens would be considered below the poverty line.

The age at which you decide to collect your Social Security benefits has a big impact on how much you’ll earn from the program over time because the longer you wait, the higher your monthly payout will be.

“Don’t just call Social Security and apply at age 62. Everybody has options. A married couple could receive $1 to $1.5 million in benefits over their lifetime. And single people could maybe half of that,” says Marc Kiner, a CPA at Premier Social Security Consulting. “And do not assume that Social Security will review your options with you.”

Select spoke to Kiner and Jim Blair, the lead consultant at Premier, about some of the factors you should consider when deciding when to apply for Social Security benefits.

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Bringing Cost Of Living Into The Equation

It

When you factor in the cost of living adjustment that SSA provides, there’s even a stronger case for George to wait. The SSA reasons that costs of living rise by 2% each year, and they reflect this as an increase in the monthly benefit checks.

So with this added bonus, George can expect the more true figures to be as follows:

  • $479,047 if he started benefits at age 62
  • $541,840 if he started benefits at age 66
  • $567,416 if he started benefits at age 70

If George lives to age 82, he will collect the maximum amount of income over his full life by waiting until age 70 to begin taking his benefits. In George’s case, his break even age is 80. This means that if he waits until age 70 to collect, he must live to at least age 80 to receive the same total dollars he would have received if he started taking benefits earlier.

As you can see, there is a lot of money at stake. And of course, no one knows how long they’ll live with any certainty. But you can still make a solid choice about when to receive your Social Security benefit by weighing the many outcomes, as George did.

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How The Length Of Your Career Affects Your Benefits

One of the most important factors when it comes to your benefit amount is the number of years you’ve worked. Most people become eligible for Social Security retirement benefits once they’ve earned income for 10 years, but you’ll need to work for at least 35 years to receive the maximum benefit amount.

When calculating the amount you’ll receive, the Social Security Administration takes an average of your wages throughout the 35 highest-earning years of your career. That number is then adjusted for inflation, and the result is the amount you’ll collect if you claim at your full retirement age .

If you work more than 35 years, only the years with the highest earnings will be counted — which could increase your average and result in a higher benefit amount. If you work fewer than 35 years, however, you’ll have zeros added to the equation, which will bring down your average.

What If I Take Benefits Early

If you choose to receive your Social Security check up to 36 months before your full retirement age, be aware that your benefit is permanently reduced by five-ninths of 1% for each month.

If you start more than 36 months before your full retirement age, the benefit is further reduced by five-twelfths of 1% per month, for the rest of retirement.

For example, let’s assume that you stop working at age 62. If your full retirement age is 66 and 2 months you elect to start benefits at age 62, the reduced benefit calculation is based on 50 months. This means that the reduction for the first 36 months is 20% and 5.83% for the remaining 14 months. Overall, your benefits would be permanently reduced by 25.83%.

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If You Were Born Between 1943 And 1954 Your Full Retirement Age Is 66

You can start your Social Security retirement benefits as early as age 62, but the benefit amount you receive will be less than your full retirement benefit amount.

The chart below provides examples of the percentage of your full retirement benefit amount you and your spouse would receive from age 62 up to your full retirement age.

Full Retirement Age Vs Early Retirement Age

Retired Early on Social Security Can I Work Full Time

While understanding your full retirement age is a key part of the puzzle, its different from when you may start claiming Social Security benefits. Thats your early retirement age, which is 62 regardless of what year you were born. And while all Americans may start receiving benefits when they turn 62, doing so will decrease the amount of each monthly payment.

Heres a bit of the Social Security Administrations official jargon, which is essential for getting a complete picture of your benefits. Full retirement age is how old you must be to receive your full primary insurance amount , or the base-rate Social Security benefit youre eligible for given your lifetime earnings history.

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How Social Security Calculates Your Benefit

The amount you receive in Social Security benefits is based on an average of your 35 highest-earning years. So if you’re earning more now than ever before, your best bet is to keep working, if that’s possible, and delay receiving benefits until age 70. You’ll then be eligible for your maximum benefit.

On the other hand, if you keep working but start taking benefits early, you may run up against the Social Security income limits. For 2021, Social Security will deduct $1 of every $2 you earn over $18,960 if you are under your full retirement age. During the year you reach full retirement age, it will deduct $1 for every $3 you earn over $50,520 until the month you reach full retirement age. After that, you’ll receive your entire benefit.

Note that any money Social Security withholds from your benefit isn’t lost forever. After you reach full retirement age, Social Security will recalculate your benefit and increase it to account for the benefits that were withheld earlier.

The reduction in Social Security benefits for people who earn over a certain amount is based only on earned income. Unearned income, such as from pensions or investments, doesn’t count.

Can You Collect Social Security At 62 And Still Work

Yes, you can begin collecting Social Security as early as age 62, and you can still work while you collect these benefits. However, there is a limit to the amount that you can make while receiving benefits. Most people working full time will earn more than the limit of $18,960, and their benefits will be reduced by $1 for every $2 that they earn over the limit. If working part-time or full-time and earning less than this limit, then there will be no reduction in benefits.

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Income Earned During The Year You Reach Fra

During the year you reach FRA, and up to that month you reach FRA, Social Security will deduct $1 for every $3 you earn that is over the annual earnings limit. For the year in which you will reach FRA, the earnings limit is different.

In 2021, this earnings limit is $50,520 , which means that you can earn up to $50,520 before having any pay deducted. The limit is $51,960 for those reaching FRA in 2022. During the year in which you reach FRA, Social Security only counts earnings that you receive before the month you reach FRA.

For example, let’s assume you were born in 1955, which means your FRA is age 66. You turned 66 in June 2021 and began your Social Security benefits at that time. You earned $44,000 from January through May of 2021. Your benefits will not be reduced, because you earned less than $50,520 during the months before you attained full retirement age.

The Social Security Administration website provides additional examples of how this deduction works. You can also use the earnings test calculator and plug in your date of birth and expected earnings to see whether you think a reduction will apply to you.

What To Know About Working While Receiving Retirement Benefits

Social Security: 4 Good Reasons To File Early

    Andy Smith is a Certified Financial Planner , licensed realtor and educator with over 35 years of diverse financial management experience. He is an expert on personal finance, corporate finance and real estate and has assisted thousands of clients in meeting their financial goals over his career.

    The Balance / Marina Li

    If you take Social Security benefits before you reach your full retirement age, and you earn an annual income in excess of the annual earnings limit for that year, your monthly Social Security benefit will be reduced for the remainder of the year in which you exceed the limit. If you will reach full retirement age during that same year, it will be reduced every month until you reach full retirement age.

    The income withheld will be paid out once you reach full retirement age. In other words, your benefits aren’t lost they’re delayed.

    Investment income does not count toward the annual earnings limit the only income that counts is earned incomethe income you earn by working either for someone or as a self-employed person.

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    What Is The Breakeven Point

    Social Security has a breakeven point at which youll have drawn the same amount of benefits regardless of when you started. For example, imagine you have the option to draw $1,500 monthly at age 62 vs. $2,100 at age 67. If you start at age 62, youll have drawn $90,000 by the time you hit age 67. Since youd be earning an additional $600 per month if you had waited until age 67, it will take you 150 months, or 12.5 years, to reach your breakeven point. In this case, once you reach age 79.5, youll have earned the same amount of money whether you started at age 62 or waited until age 67.

    If youre looking to maximize your total benefits, youll have to make a guess as to whether you expect to live beyond the breakeven point. Of course, no one can know with certainty how long they will live, but you can factor in variables such as life expectancy tables and your own general health and well-being to make an estimate. If youre a healthy individual who comes from a long-lived family, for example, youll likely earn the most by waiting until age 70 to begin drawing benefits.

    Income Limits For Social Security Retirement Benefits

    Many people ask, How much can you earn in 2021 and draw Social Security? The annual limit for 2021 is $18,960 for those who have not reached full retirement age. So, suppose that you begin receiving benefit payments at age 62. This special rule states that you can have no more than $18,960 in annual earnings or else your benefits will be reduced. Keep in mind that the earnings limit only applies to money earned from work. It does not include earnings from investments like an IRA or capital gains. However, if a spouse or child receives benefits based on your work record, their benefits will be reduced as a result of your earnings as well.

    If you claim benefits and have been working for the entire year, then it might be a good idea to check out the SSAs earnings test calculator. You should know that it is your responsibility to notify the Social Security Administration of your earnings. Failure to notify SSA might mean that your benefits do not get appropriately reduced, especially in your first year of working. You might continue receiving your full monthly checks, and then you will be forced to repay those extra benefits when you file your income taxes. You might even owe some additional fines and penalties as well. Be sure that you are aware of these rules when it comes to allowable monthly income so that you do not find yourself in this situation.

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    Can I Retire At 55 And Collect Social Security

    When to Pull From Your IRA Before Claiming Social Security

    So can you retire at 55 and collect Social Security? The answer, unfortunately, is no. The earliest age to begin drawing Social Security retirement benefits is 62. … Once you turn 62, you could claim Social Security retirement benefits but your earnings from consulting work could affect how much you collect.

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    Effect Of Late Retirement On Benefits

    1.Represents Full Retirement Age based on DOB Jan. 2, 1955

    2.PIA = The primary insurance amount is the basis for benefits that are paid to an individual

    To review your situation, your annual Social Security statement will list your projected benefits at age 62, full retirement age, and age 70, assuming you continue to work and earn about the same amount until age 62, full retirement age, or age 70 before retiring. If you need a copy of your annual statement, you can request one from the Social Security Administration .

    What Is The Full Retirement Age

    Your FRA, which is sometimes called your normal retirement age, is the age you are eligible for full Social Security retirement benefits.

    The year and month you reach your FRA depends on the year you were born.

    Prior to 1983, no calculation was needed as the normal retirement age was age 65 across the board.

    In 1983, Congress created a law to redefine FRA.

    FRA now works on a sliding scale to adjust for the fact that people are living longer and generally healthier lives.

    The current FRA increases a few months for each birth year, until hitting 67 for people born in 1960 and later. This change applies to everyone born in and after 1938.

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    Tax Implications Of Working While On Social Security

    Not only can working while receiving benefits lower the amount of your Social Security check, but it can also have tax implications as well. Remember that whether or not your Social Security benefits are taxable depends on your income level. All your income factors into this as well not just income from working a job. So, any income that you receive from annuities or other investments counts toward the total. You might find yourself in a situation where your benefits are reduced and up to 85% of them might become taxable as well. Most retirees want to maximize their income, so you should wait until full retirement age to start receiving your benefits if at all possible. While your benefits might still be taxable based on your personal finances, you would no longer have to worry about a reduction in benefits because of other income.

    Gaining Back The Reduction In Benefits From Working

    At what age can i collect full social security, ALQURUMRESORT.COM

    The amounts of early retirement benefits you lose as a setoff against your earnings are not necessarily gone forever. When you reach full retirement age, Social Security will recalculate upward the amount of your benefits to take into account the amounts you lost because of the earned income rule. The lost amounts will be made up only partially, however, a little bit each year. It will take up to 15 years to completely recoup your lost benefits. And remember, none of this readjustment will change the permanent percentage reduction in your benefits that was calculated when you claimed early retirement benefits .

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