Thursday, June 16, 2022

When Do You Need To Sign Up For Social Security

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Special Circumstances: Medicare With Als Or End

How do I sign up for Social Security benefits?

Medicare eligibility rules for people with ALS or end-stage renal disease are different. Individuals who qualify for Medicare with ALS or ESRD do not have to wait for your 25th month of disability to be eligible for Medicare.

If you qualify with ALS: You will automatically get Medicare Part A and Part B the month your disability benefits begin. 7

If you qualify with ESRD:8

  • For most people, Medicare coverage will start on the 1st day of the 4th month of dialysis treatment.
  • If you have an employer group health plan, Medicare will begin on the fourth month of dialysis.
  • Treatments if you have employer coverage.
  • If you participate in an at-home dialysis training program, your coverage may begin the first month of a regular course of dialysis provided the following are true:
  • You participated in training from a Medicare-approved training facility for the first three months of your regular dialysis
  • Your doctor expects you to finish training and be able to do your dialysis treatments yourself

Note, according to Medicare in order to qualify with ESRD all of the below must apply:9

For further information related to ALS and Medicare, visit www.alsa.org.

For further information related to ESRD and Medicare, visit www.medicare.gov.

Social Security Benefits For Surviving Spouses

If your spouse was receiving Social Security benefits upon their death, you must report the death as soon as possible. You can call the Social Security Administration at 1-800-772-1213 between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. on weekdays or visit your local Social Security office in person.

You are eligible for a one-time, lump-sum death benefit of $255 from Social Security if:

  • You were receiving benefits on your spouses record at the time of death, or
  • If you were living in the same household as your spouse at the time of death.

Any benefits received in the name of your spouse during the month of death or later must be returned to the Social Security Administration as soon as possible.

If your spouse worked long enough under Social Security, you may be eligible for Social Security benefits. You must be age 60 or older or disabled and 50 or older to qualify.

How much youll receive depends on the percentage of your spouses benefit as well as your age and the type of benefit youre eligible for.

You must apply for survivor benefits in person. You can call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 to request an appointment.

When Can I Start Collecting Social Security

The minimum age to claim benefits is 62. If you are turning 62 and need the income from Social Security to support yourself, then you can start claiming your benefits now. However, if you have enough other income to keep you going until you are older, you may want to delay increasing the size of your monthly benefit.

Recommended Reading: How Do I Start Social Security Benefits

Tax Considerations For Social Security Benefits

How do these tax considerations affect when you should apply for Social Security benefits? At todays , they may not have much of an impact on most people. Still, tax rates and income thresholds can change, so its worth remembering that you will lose less of your Social Security to taxes if you are in a lower marginal tax bracket when you begin to collect.

You should also note that if you decide to return to work, even part-time, and arent yet at your FRA, your Social Security benefits may be temporarily reduced. The reduction is $1 for every $2 of earned income over $18,960 in 2021 . During the year when you reach your FRA, your benefits will be reduced by $1 for every $3 in income over $50,520 in 2021 until the month when you become fully eligible. That money isnt lost, however. The SSA will credit it to your record when you reach your FRA, resulting in a higher benefit.

A Guide On Taking Social Security

4 Things You Should Know Before You Sign Up for Social Security ...

The decision of when to take Social Security is highly dependent on your circumstances. You can start taking it as early as age 62 , wait until you’ve reached full retirement age or even until age 70. While there’s no “correct” claiming age for everybody, the rule of thumb is that if you can afford to wait, delaying Social Security can pay off over a long retirement. Here are some of the rules and guidelines.

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Can You Get Social Security And Not Sign Up For Medicare

Yes, many people receive Social Security without signing up for Medicare.

Most people arent eligible for Medicare until they turn 65. As you can start collecting Social Security retirement benefits at 62, individuals may have Social Security without Medicare for several years.

Most people enroll in Part B once they turn 65, but you may decide to delay enrolling in Part B if you or your spouse has health insurance through an employer. Be sure to learn more about how Medicare enrollment works in your specific case, though. If you delay enrollment in Medicare Part B when youre first eligible and you dont have other creditable coverage, you could face late enrollment penalties for the rest of the time that you have Part B once you sign up.

As most people dont pay a premium for Part A, theres no reason to cancel the coverage, even if you dont think you need it. You are free to decline other Medicare plans, such as Parts B and D, though again you should make sure you wont cause yourself to go without coverage or have to pay late enrollment penalties in the future.

Get Ssa Benefits While Living Overseas

U.S. citizens can travel to or live in most, but not all, foreign countries and still receive their Social Security benefits. You can find out if you can receive benefits overseas by using the Social Security Administrations payment verification tool. Once you access the tool, pick the country you’re visiting or living in from the drop-down menu options.

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Spouses And Social Security Retirement Benefits

Your spouse can also claim up to 50 percent of your benefit amount if they dont have enough work credits, or if youre the higher earner. This doesnt take away from your benefit amount. For example, say you have a retirement benefit amount of $1,500 and your spouse has never worked. You can receive your monthly $1,500 and your spouse can receive up to $750. This means your household will get $2,250 each month.

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When Does It Pay To Enroll In Medicare Before Social Security

How To Sign Up For My Social Security Account Online

You might assume that it pays to sign up for Social Security prior to Medicare, but in many cases, it actually pays to enroll in Medicare first.

Unless youre disabled, you wont be able to enroll in Medicare prior to age 65. And unless youre continuing to work and receive employer-sponsored coverage, theres no benefit to delaying your Medicare enrollment more than three months after you turn 65.

So in almost all cases, your Medicare enrollment window will correspond closely with your 65th birthday, and the coverage you receive under the program wont vary based on when you enroll. But the age at which you sign up for Social Security will dictate what your monthly benefits under Social Security amount to.

Your Social Security benefits are calculated with a formula that uses your average inflation-adjusted monthly wage over your 35 highest-paid years in the workforce. Your resulting monthly benefit will be available to you in full once you reach whats known as full retirement age. That age is currently between 66 and 67, depending on your year of birth.

If you file for Social Security prior to full retirement age, your benefits will be reduced for each month you claim them early. You can also delay your Social Security benefits past full retirement age and boost them by 8% a year in the process, up until age 70, which is generally considered the latest age to claim Social Security.

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Top 5 Things You Need To Know About Medicare Enrollment

1. People are eligible for Medicare for different reasons.

Some are eligible when they turn 65. People under 65 are eligible if they have received Social Security Disability Insurance or certain Railroad Retirement Board disability benefits for at least 24 months. If they have amyotrophic lateral sclerosis , theres no waiting period for Medicare. Some people with End Stage Renal Disease may be eligible for Medicare. Its important to know the different ways that people qualify for Medicare so you can help current and former employees and their dependents anticipate their eligibility for Medicare so they can make timely and appropriate decisions about their enrollment.

2. Some people get Medicare Part A and Part B automatically and some people need to sign up for them.

People living in the United States and U.S. Territories who are already collecting Social Securityeither disability or retirementare automatically enrolled into Part A and Part B when theyre first eligible. These people will get a packet of information a few months before they turn 65 or receive their 25th month of Social Security Disability or Railroad Retirement Board benefits. At that time, they can choose to keep or decline Part B, but cant decline Part A unless they withdraw their original application for Social Security and pay back all Social Security cash benefits.

3. Enrolling in Medicare can only happen at certain times.

How To Get Started

To set up a My Social Security account, you must be at least 18 and have a Social Security number, a valid email address and a U.S. mailing address. If you want to add an extra layer of security to your account, you will also need some form of identification or financial information, such as a drivers license or tax return. Make sure that you have all of this information handy.

Heres how to set up your account.

1. Go to the My Social Security sign-up page and click on Create an Account . On the next screen click on the “Create a new account” button, then on “Sign in with LOGIN.GOV” at the top of the succeeding page. is a secure, single sign-in service members of the public can use to access accounts with participating government agencies, including Social Security.

2. Create your log-in. On the Login.gov sign-in page, click on “Create an account.” On successive screens, enter an email address and language preference, confirm your email and create a password thats at least 12 characters long.

As a general rule, longer passwords are better. Another way to strengthen them is to use a favorite phrase from a book or movie and swap in numbers and symbols for some of the letters. And dont use one youve used for other websites.

If you choose the text/phone option, youll go through that code process as part of this initial sign-in.

Congratulations! You have successfully created your online My Social Security account.

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If Health Problems Force You To Retire Early

Sometimes health problems force people to retire early. If you cannot work because of health problems, you should consider applying for Social Security disability benefits. The amount of the disability benefit is the same as a full, unreduced retirement benefit. If you are receiving Social Security disability benefits when you reach full retirement age, those benefits will be converted to retirement benefits.

When Medicare Comes Into The Mix

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Age 65 is when Medicare eligibility begins. This doesn’t mean you have to enroll in Medicare at 65 on the nose. If you’re still working at that point and have access to an employer health insurance plan, you can hold off on registering for Medicare without incurring penalties. But if you don’t have access to a health plan through an employer, signing up for Medicare at 65 not only makes sense, but could make it so that Part B, which covers outpatient care, is less expensive throughout your retirement.

That said, you don’t have to sign up for Medicare and Social Security at the same time. And you may not want to.

Your monthly Social Security benefit is calculated based on your 35 highest-paid years in the labor force. And you’re entitled to that benefit once you reach full retirement age, or FRA.

FRA doesn’t kick in until age 67 for anyone born in 1960 or later. And so while you can file for Social Security at 65, doing so will mean reducing your monthly benefit on a permanent basis.

In fact, if your FRA is 67, signing up at 65 will shrink your benefit by 13.34%. That’s a hit you may not want to take, especially if you’re entering retirement without much in the way of savings.

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Working While Collecting Social Security Retirement

Many people choose or need, to keep working after claiming Social Security retirement benefits. However, if you continue work after claiming early retirement benefits your Social Security benefits may be reduced until you reach your full retirement age.

If you retire at age 62, Social Security will deduct money from your retirement check if you exceed a certain amount of earned income for the calendar year. For example, the income limit in 2018 was $17,040 or $1,420 per month. The income limit increases annually. Until you reach your full retirement age, Security will reduce your benefit by $1 for every $2 you earn over the income limit. Once you reach your full retirement age, you will receive your full Social Security retirement benefit with no limitation on how much income you earn from working.

The worse news is that Social Security does not apply the early retirement work penalty by simply deducting a small amount from each monthly benefit check. Instead, the agency may withhold several months entire checks until the total reduction is paid off. This means your annual budget will have to account for a certain number of months without a benefit check. Complete details on this decidedly complicated process can be found in Social Securitys pamphlet on How Work Affects Your Benefits. You can also use Social Securitys earnings test calculator to see how much your reduction will be and when your checks will be withheld.

When Should You Retire

To draw full retirement benefits, the following Social Security Administration age rules apply:

Born in 1937 or earlier – Full retirement can be drawn at age 65Born in 1938 – Full retirement can be drawn at age 65 years and 2 monthsBorn in 1939 — Full retirement can be drawn at age 65 years and 4 monthsBorn in 1940 — Full retirement can be drawn at age 65 years and 6 monthsBorn in 1941 — Full retirement can be drawn at age 65 years and 8 monthsBorn in 1942 — Full retirement can be drawn at age 65 years and 10 monthsBorn in 1943-1954 — Full retirement can be drawn at age 66Born in 1955 – Full retirement can be drawn at age 66 and 2 monthsBorn in 1956 — Full retirement can be drawn at age 66 and 4 monthsBorn in 1957 — Full retirement can be drawn at age 66 and 6 monthsBorn in 1958 — Full retirement can be drawn at age 66 and 8 monthsBorn in 1959 — Full retirement can be drawn at age 66 and 10 monthsBorn in 1960 or later — Full retirement can be drawn at age 67

Remember that while you can begin drawing Social Security retirement benefits at age 62, your benefits will be 25 percent less than what they will be if you wait until your full retirement age as shown above. Also keep in mind that no matter when you start drawing Social Security benefits, you must be 65 to be eligible for Medicare.

For example, people who waited until age 70 to retire in 2017 could get a maximum benefit of $3,538.

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Timing And Your Health Coverage

Your health insurance coverage can also play a role in deciding when to claim Social Security benefits. Do you have a health savings account to which you would like to keep contributing? If so, note that if youre age 65 or older, then receiving Social Security benefits requires you to sign up for Medicare Part A, and once you sign up for Medicare Part A, youll no longer be allowed to add funds to your HSA.

The SSA also cautions that even if you delay receiving Social Security benefits until after age 65, you might still need to apply for Medicare benefits within three months of turning 65 to avoid paying higher premiums for life for Medicare Part B and Part D.

In 2022, the average monthly premium for Part D will be $33 per month versus $31.47 in 2021. If you enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan, the average monthly premium will be $19 per month in 2022 versus $21.22 in 2021. However, if you are still receiving health insurance from your or your spouses employer, you might not yet have to enroll in Medicare.

As of Oct. 16, 2021, Social Security offices are only open by appointment, and to get an appointment you need to be in a limited, critical situation. Most people will have to transact their business online, by phone, or through the mail.

Spouses Who Dont Qualify For Their Own Social Security

My Social Security | How to Create an Account – 2021 Update

Spouses who didnt work at a paid job or didnt earn enough credits to qualify for Social Security on their own are eligible to receive benefits starting at age 62 based on their spouses record. As with claiming benefits on your own record, your spousal benefit will be reduced if you take it before reaching your FRA. The highest spousal benefit that you can receive is half of the benefit that your spouse is entitled to at their FRA.

While spouses get a lower benefit if they claim before reaching their own FRA, they will not get a larger spousal benefit by waiting to claim after their FRAsay, at age 70. However, a nonworking or lower-earning spouse may get a larger spousal benefit if the working spouse has some late-career, high-earning years that boost their benefits.

Also Check: How To Start My Social Security Benefits

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